Four Note Nothing

October 17, 2014

Nelson Cruz led the majors this year with 40 homers.  I always think of 40 as the league-leading standard for home runs; I always think that if you hit 40 homers, you should lead the league.   Historically, I know that this isn’t true; most players in my lifetime who have hit 40 homers have NOT led the league, and most years, 40 homers won’t lead the league—but in my mind, it should.   This goes back to 1960.   I basically became a baseball fan in the spring of 1961.   In 1960 Mickey Mantle led the American League in homers, with 40, and Ernie Banks led the National League with 41, so when I was trying to figure out what these numbers meant, back in the spring of 1961, I thought that 40 homers was the standard league-leading figure.   So 2014 seems normal.

 

Square Players

I got interested in the question of players who have almost-equal numbers of runs scored, RBI, strikeouts and walks. There is no player in baseball history who has identical totals in all four categories with totals above six.  Phil Rizzuto in 1956 and Red Worthington in 1934 had 6 runs scored, 6 RBI, 6 strikeouts and 6 walks, and Peanuts Lowrey in 1942 and Luis Olmo in 1951 had 4 each.

But in terms of playing time. . .well, I made up a formula: The average of the four categories, minus the standard deviation of the four categories, divided by the average of the four categories. If the four numbers are the same, that figures out to 100%; if they’re not exactly the same, then the closer they are to the same, the higher the percentage.    The highest percentage ever was by Roy Smalley in 1980:  64 runs scored, 63 RBI, 65 walks, 63 strikeouts.  These are the top ten:

 

First

Last

YEAR

R

RBI

BB

SO

Score

Roy Jr.

Smalley

1980

64

63

65

63

.985

Jerry

Royster

1985

31

31

32

31

.984

Lance

Berkman

2011

90

94

92

93

.981

Darrell

Porter

1978

77

78

75

75

.980

Rick

Leach

1987

26

25

25

25

.980

Alan

Bannister

1982

40

41

42

41

.980

Jimmy

Wynn

1974

104

108

108

104

.978

Norm

Siebern

1963

80

83

79

82

.977

Andre

Thornton

1979

89

93

90

93

.977

Rance

Mulliniks

1985

55

57

55

54

.977

 

                Two of my favorite Kansas City players there—Darrell Porter in 1978 and Norm Siebern in ’63. These are the top ten among players with an average of 80 or more:

 

First

Last

YEAR

R

RBI

BB

SO

Score

Lance

Berkman

2011

90

94

92

93

.981

Jimmy

Wynn

1974

104

108

108

104

.978

Norm

Siebern

1963

80

83

79

82

.977

Andre

Thornton

1979

89

93

90

93

.977

Dolph

Camilli

1939

105

104

110

107

.975

Jose

Bautista

2014

101

103

104

96

.965

Jeff

Heath

1947

81

85

88

87

.964

Joe

Ferguson

1973

84

88

87

81

.963

Mike

Schmidt

1979

109

114

120

115

.961

Joe

Mauer

2012

81

85

90

88

.954

 

                Basically, those are all favorite players of mine; I just love those kind of guys.  In basketball they say that the fill up the scoresheet.  Here’s the top ten with a "100" average.. .OK, eleven:

 

First

Last

YEAR

R

RBI

BB

SO

Score

Jimmy

Wynn

1974

104

108

108

104

.978

Dolph

Camilli

1939

105

104

110

107

.975

Jose

Bautista

2014

101

103

104

96

.965

Mike

Schmidt

1979

109

114

120

115

.961

Mark

McGwire

1996

104

113

116

112

.954

Ron

Santo

1967

107

98

96

103

.951

Rafael

Palmeiro

2002

99

105

104

94

.950

Eddie

Mathews

1955

108

101

109

98

.949

Jason

Giambi

2002

120

122

109

112

.946

Duke

Snider

1956

112

101

99

101

.943

David

Ortiz

2007

116

117

111

103

.943

 

                Never cared for Palmeiro; otherwise, those are my kind of guys.  Anybody can hit cleanup, anybody can lead off.

                I think of those as "square" players; if you think about the four sides of a quadrangle being 105, 104, 110 and 107 feet on a side, that’s Dolph Camilli in 1939. The least square player ever, since 1900 at least, was Tommie Agee in 1968:

 

First

Last

YEAR

R

RBI

BB

SO

Score

Tommie

Agee

1968

30

17

15

103

-.011

 

                If you think about that, you realize you can’t draw that one as a quadrangle; it’s impossible. The four "least square" players ever are all like Agee. . .no walks, no production, just lots of strikeouts:

 

First

Last

YEAR

R

RBI

BB

SO

Score

Tommie

Agee

1968

30

17

15

103

-.011

Cito

Gaston

1969

20

28

24

117

.013

Junior

Lake

2014

30

25

14

110

.017

Danny

Espinosa

2014

31

27

18

122

.017

 

                Agee is the only player who has a negative score—a standard deviation larger than the average.  After the top four, though, you start to get a few players who have a different combination:

 

First

Last

YEAR

R

RBI

BB

SO

Score

Tommie

Agee

1968

30

17

15

103

-.011

Cito

Gaston

1969

20

28

24

117

.013

Junior

Lake

2014

30

25

14

110

.017

Danny

Espinosa

2014

31

27

18

122

.017

Lloyd

Waner

1927

133

27

37

23

.049

Chris

Truby

2002

35

22

10

98

.050

B.J.

Upton

2013

30

26

44

151

.054

Emil

Verban

1949

38

22

8

2

.084

John

Shelby

1989

28

12

25

92

.087

Johnny

Jeter

1972

25

21

18

92

.091

 

                Second Emil Verban reference of the month. The "most square" players in baseball history, careers:

 

First

Last

R

RBI

BB

SO

Score

Dolph

Camilli

936

950

947

961

.989

Bruce

Bochte

643

658

653

662

.987

Eddie

Mathews

1509

1453

1444

1487

.980

Dan

Driessen

746

763

761

719

.973

Norm

Cash

1046

1103

1043

1091

.971

Edgar

Martinez

1219

1261

1283

1202

.970

Carlos

May

545

536

512

565

.959

Keith

Hernandez

1124

1071

1070

1012

.957

Steve

Kemp

581

634

576

605

.956

Jeff

Bagwell

1517

1529

1401

1558

.954

 

 

 

90% of Henry Aaron

 

                OK, here’s a second similarly stupid and useless statistical exercise.   Let’s take Henry Aaron in his best season, which I consider to be 1959 (although one Henry Aaron season is very much like another Henry Aaron season):

 

First

Last

YEAR

G

AB

R

H

2B

3B

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

Avg

OBA

SPct

OPS

Hank

Aaron

1959

154

629

116

223

46

7

39

123

51

54

8

.355

.401

.636

1.037

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                That’s a remarkable season, but what would 90% of the same season be?   To solve that puzzle I used a combination of Season Scores and Similarity Scores.   Henry Aaron’s Season Score in 1959 was 508, so 90% of that would be 457.   Then I identified the 100 seasons in baseball history (by hitters) which had season scores closest to 457, and for each of those 100 seasons, I measured their similarity to this season, to Henry Aaron in 1959.   The winner was Ripper Collins in 1934:

 

First

Last

YEAR

G

AB

R

H

2B

3B

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

Avg

OBA

SPct

OPS

Hank

Aaron

1959

154

629

116

223

46

7

39

123

51

54

8

.355

.401

.636

1.037

Ripper

Collins

1934

154

600

116

200

40

12

35

128

57

50

2

.333

.393

.615

1.008

 

                A really good match, isn’t it?    More or less the same everything as Henry Aaron; just a little bit less of it in most categories.  Then, to get 80% of Henry Aaron, I used 80% of Aaron’s season score (406), and similarity to Ripper Collins, 1934.   The winner of that one is Cal Ripken in 1991:

 

First

Last

YEAR

G

AB

R

H

2B

3B

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

Avg

OBA

SPct

OPS

Hank

Aaron

1959

154

629

116

223

46

7

39

123

51

54

8

.355

.401

.636

1.037

Ripper

Collins

1934

154

600

116

200

40

12

35

128

57

50

2

.333

.393

.615

1.008

Cal

Ripken

1991

162

650

99

210

46

5

34

114

53

46

6

.323

.374

.566

.940

 

                You could use 80% of Henry Aaron and similarity to Henry Aaron, but for technical reasons that does not work as well; it would be a lot easier, but it doesn’t work as well.  Anyway, in this way we can get 90% of Henry Aaron, 80%, 70%, 60%, 50%, etc.:

 

First

Last

YEAR

G

AB

R

H

2B

3B

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

Avg

OBA

SPct

OPS

Hank

Aaron

1959

154

629

116

223

46

7

39

123

51

54

8

.355

.401

.636

1.037

Ripper

Collins

1934

154

600

116

200

40

12

35

128

57

50

2

.333

.393

.615

1.008

Cal

Ripken

1991

162

650

99

210

46

5

34

114

53

46

6

.323

.374

.566

.940

Magglio

Ordonez

2003

160

606

95

192

46

3

29

99

57

73

9

.317

.380

.546

.926

Bill

White

1962

159

614

93

199

31

3

20

102

58

69

9

.324

.386

.482

.868

Robinson

Cano

2014

157

595

77

187

37

2

14

82

61

68

10

.314

.382

.454

.836

Victor

Martinez

2013

159

605

68

182

36

0

14

83

54

62

0

.301

.355

.430

.785

Ray

Knight

1980

162

618

71

163

39

7

14

78

36

62

1

.264

.307

.417

.724

Jim

Davenport

1958

134

434

70

111

22

3

12

41

33

64

1

.256

.317

.403

.720

Jim

Spencer

1969

113

386

39

98

14

3

10

31

26

53

1

.254

.304

.383

.688

 

                Conclusions:   60% of Henry Aaron is a hell of a player.   60% of Henry Aaron, 1959, is Bill White, 1962, and Bill White in 1962 has 199 hits, 93 runs scored and 102 RBI, a .386 on base percentage.     Then you drop down to Robinson Cano, 2014—still a terrific hitter—and then Victor Martinez, 2013, who is still very, very good.  I love the way that the OPS goes down in almost regular steps:  1.037, 1.008, .940, .926, .868, .836, .785, .724, .720, and .688.  Home runs never go up; some of the categories tick up a little bit as they head generally down.  The process works really well until you get down to 30%; then the 20% (Jim Davenport) and the 10% (Jim Spencer) seem a little bit arbitrary, because the percentage declines are larger down there.

                This is 90% (and 80%, and 70%) of A-Rod, 2007:

 

First

Last

YEAR

G

AB

R

H

2B

3B

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

CS

Avg

OBA

SPct

OPS

Alex

Rodriguez

2007

158

583

143

183

31

0

54

156

95

120

24

4

.314

.422

.645

1.067

Alex

Rodriguez

2005

162

605

124

194

29

1

48

130

91

139

21

6

.321

.421

.610

1.031

Alex

Rodriguez

2003

161

607

124

181

30

6

47

118

87

126

17

3

.298

.396

.600

.995

Greg

Vaughn

1998

158

573

112

156

28

4

50

119

79

121

11

4

.272

.363

.597

.960

George

Foster

1978

158

604

97

170

26

7

40

120

70

138

4

4

.281

.360

.546

.906

Nelson

Cruz

2014

159

613

87

166

32

2

40

108

55

140

4

5

.271

.333

.525

.859

Nate

Colbert

1970

156

572

84

148

17

6

38

86

56

150

3

5

.259

.328

.509

.836

Jason

Bay

2007

145

538

78

133

25

2

21

84

59

141

4

1

.247

.327

.418

.746

Randy

Hundley

1969

151

522

67

133

15

1

18

64

61

90

2

3

.255

.334

.391

.725

Mike

Matheny

2003

141

441

43

111

18

2

8

47

44

81

1

1

.252

.320

.356

.676

 

                Nelson Cruz on the list; second Nelson Cruz reference of the article.  The most similar player to A-Rod is A-Rod; that almost happens to Aaron several times, too.   There are several times that another Aaron season almost registers as most similar to the target.   Here’s a favorite of mine:  90% of Joe Morgan, 1976:

 

First

Last

YEAR

G

AB

R

H

2B

3B

HR

RBI

BB

SO

SB

CS

Avg

OBA

SPct

OPS

Joe

Morgan

1976

141

472

113

151

30

5

27

111

114

41

60

9

.320

.444

.576

1.020

Rickey

Henderson

1990

136

489

119

159

33

3

28

61

97

60

65

10

.325

.439

.577

1.016

Joe

Morgan

1973

157

576

116

167

35

2

26

82

111

61

67

15

.290

.406

.493

.899

Rickey

Henderson

1993

134

481

114

139

22

2

21

59

120

65

53

8

.289

.432

.474

.906

Von

Hayes

1987

158

556

84

154

36

5

21

84

121

77

16

7

.277

.404

.473

.877

Rickey

Henderson

1991

134

470

105

126

17

1

18

57

98

73

58

18

.268

.400

.423

.823

Joe

Morgan

1971

160

583

87

149

27

11

13

56

88

52

40

8

.256

.351

.407

.757

Craig

Counsell

2005

150

578

85

148

34

4

9

42

78

69

26

7

.256

.350

.375

.726

Bill

Doran

1983

154

535

70

145

12

7

8

39

86

67

12

12

.271

.371

.364

.736

Vic

Harris

1973

152

555

71

138

14

7

8

44

55

81

13

12

.249

.317

.342

.659

 

                For that one, because the skill set is so unique, I had to use 150 players in the test range, rather than 100. . ..but it still works.   In this group it even works down to 10%; Vic Harris, although certainly not an impact player in the Rickey Henderson/Joe Morgan mold, still has some recognizable faint image of their skills. 

                Again. . .it’s stupid, but I love it.   Another way to diminish Henry Aaron in stages is to

a)      Take the entire universe of player/seasons,

b)      Eliminate everybody who is better than Aaron in any category,

c)       Take the best seasons remaining, and

d)      Repeat the process.

 

When you do that, the quality of the seasons diminishes much more rapidly, but you get a longer "tail" of low-quality qualifying seasons.   Since I didn’t know whether I should use strikeouts to eliminate all players with MORE strikeouts or all players with FEWER strikeouts, I just ignored strikeouts (and caught stealing):

 

First

Last

YEAR

G

AB

R

H

2B

3B

HR

RBI

BB

SB

Avg

OBA

SPct

OPS

Hank

Aaron

1959

154

629

116

223

46

7

39

123

51

8

.355

.401

.636

1.037

Chick

Hafey

1928

138

520

101

175

46

6

27

111

40

8

.337

.386

.604

.990

Geoff

Jenkins

1999

135

447

70

140

43

3

21

82

35

5

.313

.371

.564

.935

Garret

Anderson

2007

108

417

67

124

31

1

16

80

27

1

.297

.336

.492

.827

Matt

Williams

2001

106

408

58

112

30

0

16

65

22

1

.275

.314

.466

.780

Rod

Barajas

2008

104

349

44

87

23

0

11

49

17

0

.249

.294

.410

.704

John

Mabry

2000

95

226

35

53

13

0

8

32

15

0

.235

.287

.398

.685

Taylor

Teagarden

2009

60

198

26

43

13

0

6

24

14

0

.217

.270

.374

.644

Joe

Rudi

1981

49

122

14

22

3

0

6

24

8

0

.180

.239

.352

.591

Jim

Mahoney

1959

31

23

10

3

0

0

1

4

3

0

.130

.231

.261

.492

Pepper

Martin

1930

6

1

5

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

.000

.000

.000

.000

Reno

Bertoia

1962

5

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

.000

.000

.000

.000

Bobby

Valentine

1969

5

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

.000

.000

.000

.000

Jake

Gibbs

1962

2

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

.000

.000

.000

.000

Wally

Hood

1922

2

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

.000

.000

.000

.000

 

That’s kind of fun, but it’s not as much fun as the other approach.   The other system works better because an individual column can go up a little bit as well as down; in the Joe Morgan example stolen bases go up from 60 to 65 to 67.   Here nothing can go up, which causes things to ratchet toward zero much more rapidly.

 

Triple Crown Scores

In 2012, as Miguel Cabrera was closing in on the first Triple Crown season since Whitey Ford retired, I developed a system of "Triple Crown Scores".  The Triple Crown Score was a way of putting Home Runs, RBI and Batting Average into one column, such that, if there was a Triple Crown contender, he would be 100% certain to lead the league in Triple Crown Score, but the fact that Chris Davis was hitting 53 homers in 2013 would not make Miguel Cabrera’s 2013 season (44 HR, 137 RBI, .348 average) less impressive than his 2012 season (44, 139, .330). 

Anyway, since I dropped the Triple Crown system on you in August, 2012, I haven’t said anything about it.  Here’s a list of the top Triple Crown Seasons of 2012, 2013 and 2014:

 

2  0   1  2       S  e  a  s  o  n

Rank

First

Last

YEAR

HR

RBI

Avg

Triple Crown Score

1

Miguel

Cabrera

2012

44

139

.330

801

2

Josh

Hamilton

2012

43

128

.285

683

3

Adrian

Beltre

2012

36

102

.321

662

4

Edwin

Encarnacion

2012

42

110

.280

633

5

Prince

Fielder

2012

30

108

.313

623

6

Billy

Butler

2012

29

107

.313

613

7

Robinson

Cano

2012

33

94

.313

611

8

Mike

Trout

2012

30

83

.326

597

9

Albert

Pujols

2012

30

105

.285

560

10

Josh

Willingham

2012

35

110

.260

550

               

1

Ryan

Braun

2012

41

112

.319

709

2

Andrew

McCutchen

2012

31

96

.327

632

3

Buster

Posey

2012

24

103

.336

622

4

Chase

Headley

2012

31

115

.286

589

5

Giancarlo

Stanton

2012

37

86

.290

573

6

Aramis

Ramirez

2012

27

105

.300

572

7

Matt

Holliday

2012

27

102

.295

557

8

Adam

LaRoche

2012

33

100

.271

541

9

Alfonso

Soriano

2012

32

108

.262

532

10

Allen

Craig

2012

22

92

.307

530

 

 

2  0   1  3       S  e  a  s  o  n

Rank

First

Last

YEAR

HR

RBI

Avg

Triple Crown Score

1

Miguel

Cabrera

2013

44

137

.348

833

2

Chris

Davis

2013

53

138

.286

748

3

Robinson

Cano

2013

27

107

.314

604

4

David

Ortiz

2013

30

103

.309

604

5

Mike

Trout

2013

27

97

.323

601

6

Adrian

Beltre

2013

30

92

.315

595

7

Adam

Jones

2013

33

108

.285

584

8

Edwin

Encarnacion

2013

36

104

.272

567

9

Josh

Donaldson

2013

24

93

.301

531

10

Prince

Fielder

2013

25

106

.279

520

               

1

Paul

Goldschmidt

2013

36

125

.302

671

2

Freddie

Freeman

2013

23

109

.319

595

3

Michael

Cuddyer

2013

20

84

.331

551

4

Jayson

Werth

2013

25

82

.318

550

5

Troy

Tulowitzki

2013

25

82

.312

537

6

Andrew

McCutchen

2013

21

84

.317

529

7

Hunter

Pence

2013

27

99

.283

526

8

Hanley

Ramirez

2013

20

57

.345

525

9

Jay

Bruce

2013

30

109

.262

522

10

Matt

Holliday

2013

22

94

.300

520

 

 

2  0   1  4       S  e  a  s  o  n

Rank

First

Last

YEAR

HR

RBI

Avg

Triple Crown Score

1

Victor

Martinez

2014

32

103

.335

668

2

Jose

Abreu

2014

36

107

.317

663

3

Mike

Trout

2014

36

111

.287

613

4

Nelson

Cruz

2014

40

108

.271

598

5

Miguel

Cabrera

2014

25

109

.313

593

6

Jose

Bautista

2014

35

103

.286

587

7

Michael

Brantley

2014

20

97

.327

569

8

David

Ortiz

2014

35

104

.263

543

9

Edwin

Encarnacion

2014

34

98

.268

537

10

Adam

Jones

2014

29

96

.281

528

               

1

Giancarlo

Stanton

2014

37

105

.288

607

2

Adrian

Gonzalez

2014

27

116

.276

546

3

Andrew

McCutchen

2014

25

83

.314

544

4

Buster

Posey

2014

22

89

.311

532

5

Anthony

Rizzo

2014

32

78

.286

521

6

Corey

Dickerson

2014

24

76

.312

520

7

Justin

Upton

2014

29

102

.270

519

8

Adrian

Gonzalez

2013

22

100

.293

519

9

Troy

Tulowitzki

2014

21

52

.340

509

10

Carlos

Gonzalez

2012

22

85

.303

508

 

So the "Triple Crown Leaders" for the last three years are Miguel Cabrera and Ryan Braun (2012), Miguel Cabrera and Paul Goldschmidt (2013), and Victor Martinez and Giancarlo Stanton (2014).

 

 
 

COMMENTS (11 Comments, most recent shown first)

Jamesammon
How about any Bobby Abreu year from 2001-2009?
3:07 PM Nov 20th
 
mauimike
This is what happens when your team goes 71-91.
4:17 AM Oct 18th
 
JimPertierra
Bill,
Thoroughly enjoyed this article and was stunned to see the Morgan comparisons but also loved the fact that ARod was so similar to himself. I would assume that the Yankees would love to have 30% of that ARod also assuming that they would love to have any ARod.
Just a quick note totally off the subject, but we are playing backwards through Baseball history in the TML now (using Diamond Mind) and are rapidly approaching the 1963 rookie draft (Where Stan the Man, Yogi and Early Wynn will now be rookies). Thought you would be interested to know that Pat Barry is looking like he will get first pick and take Stan to add to his oufield of Duke Snider and Mickey Mantle for the next 13 years. That will be hard to contend with.
Love to see those career square scores.
Best/Jim​
3:54 AM Oct 18th
 
CharlesSaeger
Wasn't there a ratio in the old Abstracts of how well a player was suited for batting leadoff versus cleanup? It was something like (BB+SB)/(TB-H).
8:43 PM Oct 17th
 
Davidg32
Enjoyed this little feature, Bill. Thanks for posting it.
I started following baseball a year or two after you, and...to me...any self-respecting home run champ should hit around 45. We had Killebrew and Mays and Aaron and McCovey and Frank Howard and Yaz and Frank Robinson. 45 is little more respectable a number. In 1965, curiously, we had both the low league leader of the decade (Conigliaro with 32) and the high league leader of the decade (Mays 52).
When the 70's came around, it seemed that a lot of the league leaders hit in the low-mid 30's. At first it was just the American League...the NL had Stargell and Schmidt and Bench staying up there in the 40's. But then in the 80's both leagues were doing it.
And a league home run leader who led the league with a total in the 30's always seemed like a "sissy" home run champion to me. (I blame Bill Melton for starting that crap.)
And then along came steroids....
6:53 PM Oct 17th
 
jdw
It might be going about it in a different direction: some combination of OBP and SLG.

What we would be trying to get across is that 1982-88 Downing could be either a top of the order or middle of the order hitter with his .265/.373/.457 line.

Where as 1984-89 George Bell with his .292/.331/.503 isn't a top of the order guy, and 1984-89 Brett Butler (.287/.372/.389) isn't a middle of the order guy.

Downing wasn't really a high end middle of the order guy as his power was in the 25/2/23 2B/3B/HR range in those years, and his BA wasn't robust. But he would be comfortably good in that role good OBP and reasonable power.

Side note on Downing: it isn't a major thing for most players in that era, but OBP captures his HBP qualities. 82 BB is a very good number, but he had the nice kicked in those years of a 11 HBP average. Take them away and he drops 10+ points of OBP.

4:20 PM Oct 17th
 
tangotiger
I mean quality of hitter.
2:00 PM Oct 17th
 
tangotiger
In terms of players who could leadoff or hit cleanup, you can get there by the "power-speed" number that Bill has, except use walks instead.

The formula is:
2/(1/BB + 1/HR)

So, 30 HR and 100 walks is 46.

Of course, 100 HR and 30 walks is also 46, and that's probably not an equivalent combination.

If you do:
5/(1/BB + 4/HR)

You get 35. To get 35 with 30 walks, you'd need 36 HR. Which I think makes more sense.

Maybe. You can play around with it, and see what works best.

And you also need an overall quality check as well.
2:00 PM Oct 17th
 
jdw
Another one of your favorites just misses the 80+ list:

1986 Brian Downing: 90/95/90/84 = .950

Similar comment you made: could leadoff (unorthodox by outstanding), and could hit clean up.
1:42 PM Oct 17th
 
tigerlily
Thanks Bill. Regarding A-Rod - 90% of A-Rod is an MVP season (2005) as is 80% (2003).
1:09 PM Oct 17th
 
Siskokid
Another way of looking at the 3 lists is to see who are on all 3 lists to get a sense of consistency (both in terms of stats and health). There are 4--3 being Cabrera, McCutchen and Trout who would be on most people's list of the 3 best players in baseball. The other is Encarnacion who would (should) get on most people's list of the most underrated player.
12:09 PM Oct 17th
 
 
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