The 10 Levels Study: Third Hit

June 18, 2014

15.  Roger Craig, 1963

                Roger Craig had a famous Tough Luck season in 1963, pitching for the expansion Mets, when he was 5-22 with a 3.78 ERA (5-21 as a starter, one loss in relief.)   In the section above he shows with a Good Games Record of 18 – 11.

                What struck me is that no other approach to evaluating that season that I am aware of would show Craig as deserving of a record as good as 18-11.  His ERA was higher than the league norm, and yes, it was a hitter’s park, but Lee Sinins’ Complete Baseball Encyclopedia still shows him as ten runs worse than league average, park adjusted (-10), and as deserving of a won-lost record of 12-15.

                This Good Games Record is vulnerable to the flaws created when you draw a straight line through the data.   A game is either on one side or the other; a "6" is the same as a "10" for this purpose, a "0" is the same as a "4".    Details can get lost.   I’m not claiming it’s a perfect method. 

                Still, I have more confidence in this analysis than I have in any analysis based simply on season totals.   Season totals miss things, too; getting roughed up a few times looks exactly the same in the post-season totals as pitching consistently poorly.   Pitching against a bad team looks the same as pitching against the ’61 Yankees.  

                The question I would pose here is, could the traditional methods be systematically over-rating the pitchers on good teams, and under-rating the pitchers on bad teams, because the traditional methods ignore the issue of the quality of competition faced?    Almost all lines of sabermetric analysis, I believe, build on the assumption that the quality of competition you face evens out over the course of the season.

                But, of course, it doesn’t even out; I started to say that it doesn’t necessarily even out, but a more accurate statement would be that it necessarily doesn’t even out.  Suppose that you are playing in an 8-team league, with a .620 team, a .585 team, a .550 team, a .515 team, a .485 team, a .450 team, a .415 team, and a .380 team.  Suppose that a starting pitcher makes 5 starts against each of the other 7 teams.   The pitcher on the .620 team (the 100-win team) not only has the advantage of having a better team behind him—which we understand and adjust for—but also has the advantage that he is in effect competing in a .483 league, .483 being the average winning percentage of his opponents.    The pitcher on the bad team—the 100-loss team—is in effect competing in a .517 league.  It’s not an immense difference, but it is not a trivial difference, either.   It’s a factor.

                Of course, this difference gets smaller if there are more teams in the league—but it gets larger if you are playing for a worse team.   The 1963 Mets were not a .380 team, the bottom feeders of my theoretical example; they were a .315 team.  The average quality of competition that Craig would have faced in 1963, assuming he faced each of the other nine teams an equal number of times, would have been .521.

                Has Craig’s season been systematically undervalued by other analysts, and by myself up to now, because we have failed to systematically adjust for this bias?   I would suspect that the answer is "yes".   I can’t say that for certain, because I don’t really understand all of the analytical approaches that everybody else uses; I would be a better person if I did understand them all, but I don’t.   It just seems to me that there could be something there that everybody has been missing up to now.

 

16.  Rotation Patterns

                In one of the charts above I showed you the number of pitchers starting on two days’ rest or less, by year.   While I was doing that, I decided to count the number of pitchers starting on 3 days rest, 4 days rest, etc.   In the chart below "2 days" means 2 days rest or less, and "7 days" means seven days’ rest or more.   Some of the data from the 1950s will be screwy because we are missing games.   If we’re missing a couple of starts then a pitcher who started on three days’ rest might show up as starting on 17 days rests, so. ..be careful with the data from the 1950s.   The percentages on the right are the percentage of 3-to-6 day totals, ignoring the off-rotation numbers.   This has the effect of making the missing data irrelevant to the percentages, since the starts after "Missing" starts would always be off-rotation. 

 

Year

2 days

3 days

4 days

5 days

6 days

7 days

 

3 Day %

4 Day %

5 Day %

1952

70

347

472

256

171

758

 

28%

38%

21%

1953

71

374

511

325

204

727

 

26%

36%

23%

1954

62

422

614

309

188

665

 

28%

40%

20%

1955

52

371

564

293

174

732

 

26%

40%

21%

                     

1956

79

502

638

303

176

650

 

31%

39%

19%

1957

64

512

705

308

178

623

 

30%

41%

18%

1958

58

608

678

345

165

582

 

34%

38%

19%

1959

43

647

705

304

190

567

 

35%

38%

16%

1960

56

585

761

337

185

542

 

31%

41%

18%

                     

1961

62

653

938

438

199

570

 

29%

42%

20%

1962

64

869

995

428

200

660

 

35%

40%

17%

1963

47

974

961

418

181

651

 

38%

38%

16%

1964

58

911

1023

385

189

674

 

36%

41%

15%

1965

64

1046

968

351

160

627

 

41%

38%

14%

                     

1966

61

1090

861

335

180

673

 

44%

35%

14%

1967

51

906

1016

435

199

609

 

35%

40%

17%

1968

39

960

1076

382

142

593

 

38%

42%

15%

1969

57

1275

1235

431

227

667

 

40%

39%

14%

1970

44

1153

1410

487

166

628

 

36%

44%

15%

                     

1971

44

1034

1484

459

189

638

 

33%

47%

14%

1972

81

1115

1214

520

179

601

 

37%

40%

17%

1973

95

1346

1298

383

124

626

 

43%

41%

12%

1974

26

1226

1414

451

154

619

 

38%

44%

14%

1975

36

1194

1368

439

166

665

 

38%

43%

14%

                     

1976

31

860

1613

527

188

659

 

27%

51%

17%

1977

32

959

1624

645

230

716

 

28%

47%

19%

1978

26

818

1714

650

255

741

 

24%

50%

19%

1979

13

711

1862

666

175

769

 

21%

55%

20%

1980

14

596

1988

707

204

701

 

17%

57%

20%

                     

1981

5

388

1284

460

108

543

 

17%

57%

21%

1982

19

494

2062

781

180

678

 

14%

59%

22%

1983

7

433

2129

800

196

653

 

12%

60%

22%

1984

8

326

2220

772

195

689

 

9%

63%

22%

1985

12

452

2147

735

193

667

 

13%

61%

21%

                     

1986

12

390

2177

839

160

628

 

11%

61%

24%

1987

8

293

2258

817

185

649

 

8%

64%

23%

1988

7

214

2253

927

165

634

 

6%

63%

26%

1989

5

241

2213

936

167

650

 

7%

62%

26%

1990

16

189

2408

803

161

633

 

5%

68%

23%

                     

1991

6

136

2354

929

160

623

 

4%

66%

26%

1992

3

65

2364

952

175

653

 

2%

66%

27%

1993

8

128

2524

1026

160

692

 

3%

66%

27%

1994

4

72

1759

729

121

515

 

3%

66%

27%

1995

10

189

2332

769

135

599

 

6%

68%

22%

                     

1996

5

111

2543

1004

183

688

 

3%

66%

26%

1997

5

96

2505

1008

211

707

 

3%

66%

26%

1998

5

45

2608

1301

255

650

 

1%

62%

31%

1999

3

70

2453

1419

229

682

 

2%

59%

34%

2000

7

44

2521

1357

193

736

 

1%

61%

33%

                     

2001

4

34

2375

1432

202

811

 

1%

59%

35%

2002

3

17

2561

1289

246

736

 

0%

62%

31%

2003

3

51

2451

1383

283

689

 

1%

59%

33%

2004

3

50

2457

1386

231

729

 

1%

60%

34%

2005

3

42

2596

1398

184

639

 

1%

62%

33%

                     

2006

2

32

2497

1411

196

720

 

1%

60%

34%

2007

1

22

2515

1383

202

739

 

1%

61%

34%

2008

2

38

2448

1431

251

686

 

1%

59%

34%

2009

2

11

2461

1485

214

687

 

0%

59%

36%

2010

1

16

2438

1573

226

606

 

0%

57%

37%

                     

2011

3

15

2331

1622

243

644

 

0%

55%

39%

2012

2

31

2260

1638

253

676

 

1%

54%

39%

2013

3

5

2370

1490

269

725

 

0%

57%

36%

 

                Note that the percentage of pitchers starting on 3 days rest increased from 29% to 44% in five years, 1961 to 1966.  Up to 1960 managers used kind of loosy-goosy rotations, playing left/right matchups and moving pitchers from the rotation to the bullpen to get the matchup they wanted.  Between 1959 and 1966 the belief that pitchers would be more effective if used in a regular rotation swept the game, resulting in much more stable rotations.

                We can see in this chart that the four-man rotation remained the norm until 1973, and that the shift toward the five-man rotation really began in 1974.   Some teams were using five starters in some seasons before 1974, but before 1974 it was not a trend.   The great shift from the four-man to the five-man rotation happened between 1973 and 1984.

                We can also see, however, that there continues to be some shift in the patterns even in the last ten years.   In 2003 there were 51 starters working on three days rest; in 2013 the number was 5.  In 2002 there were twice as many starters working on four days rest as on five days rest, 62% to 31%; by 2012 that ratio was only 54-39.   As recently as 1995, only 22% of major league starters were working on five days’ rest.   Within a very few years, it appears likely that that number will go over 40%.

 

17.  Why the Steroid Era Creates Dominance

(Apart from the fact that Pitchers Also Used Steroids)

                Two of the most dominant starting pitchers of all time, Randy Johnson and Pedro Martinez, did their best work in the very heart of the steroid era.  We will hear not infrequently that what these pitchers did was especially remarkable because it was done in the steroid era, when run-scoring levels were at historic highs.

                Well, yes, but. . ..In a certain sense a high run context acts as a magnifying glass on the statistics, increasing the separation between the great and the ordinary.

                If all baseball games were 1 to 0—that is, if every game ended when the first run was scored—then the distinctions between the best pitchers and the average would be minimized.  Sandy Koufax wouldn’t go 26-8; he would go 21-13.   Pedro Martinez wouldn’t go 23-4; he would 18-9.

                How do we know that?   If every game was 1-0, then the team’s winning percentage would be the same as their run ratio.    We know what those run ratios were.   In games started by Sandy Koufax in 1966, the Dodgers outscored their opponents, 165-104.   In games started by Pedro Martinez in 1999, the Red Sox outscored their opponents, 159 to 85.

                The more runs are scored in a game, the fewer games it takes for the better team—or the better pitcher—to assert dominance.   I am sure that there are a lot of you who know this and think that I am wasting your time in pointing it out, but a lot of people don’t get it.  In a moment we’ll list the best Good Game Percentages in the data.   A disproportionate number of these will be from the steroid era.

                The system does not favor pitchers from the steroid era, but, to a small extent, it does favor a great pitcher from the steroid era, as opposed to a great pitcher from another era.   In this sense, Pedro has an advantage over Gibson or Koufax. 

 

18.  Good Game Percentage Leaders

 

Year

First

Last

Starts

Good Games

Bad Games

Good Game Percentage

1997

Randy

Johnson

29

25

0

1.000

1980

Steve

Carlton

38

34

1

.971

2001

Randy

Johnson

34

31

1

.969

1968

Bob

Gibson

34

30

1

.968

1999

Pedro

Martinez

29

27

1

.964

2000

Pedro

Martinez

29

27

1

.964

1990

Roger

Clemens

31

27

2

.931

1995

Greg

Maddux

28

24

2

.923

1964

Sandy

Koufax

28

23

2

.920

1994

Greg

Maddux

25

23

2

.920

1969

Bob

Gibson

35

30

3

.909

1985

Dwight

Gooden

35

30

3

.909

2002

Randy

Johnson

35

30

3

.909

1978

Ron

Guidry

35

29

3

.906

1968

Dave

McNally

35

28

3

.903

1997

Pedro

Martinez

31

28

3

.903

2013

Clayton

Kershaw

33

26

3

.897

1968

Luis

Tiant

32

26

3

.897

1969

Steve

Carlton

31

25

3

.893

1986

Mike

Scott

37

33

4

.892

 

                Three seasons by Randy, three by Pedro, two each by Gibson, Carlton and Maddux, one each by Clemens, Koufax, Gooden, Guidry, Kershaw, Tiant, Mike Scott and Dave McNally.

 

19.  Performance Norms At Each Level

                In this study, pitchers who have a "10" performance have an overall winning percentage of .959, and an ERA of 0.47.  Pitchers who have a "0" performance have a winning percentage of .003 and an ERA of 18.52.

 

 

WPct

 

ERA

Group 10

.959

 

0.47

Group 9

.860

 

1.25

Group 8

.769

 

1.81

Group 7

.682

 

2.38

Group 6

.593

 

3.01

Group 5

.494

 

3.72

Group 4

.386

 

4.60

Group 3

.268

 

5.71

Group 2

.136

 

7.30

Group 1

.038

 

10.16

Group 0

.003

 

18.52

 

                Plus, remember that the competition faced by pitchers in Group 6 was tougher than the competition faced by pitchers in Group 5, etc.  The most relevant point here is that each step upward has more or less the same impact on the winning percentage.   The increase from Group 0 to Group 1 is only 35 points, whereas the increase from "2" to "3" is 132 points, but that gap mostly disappears if we focus on the winning percentage of the pitcher’s team, rather than the winning percentage of the pitcher:

 

 

WPct

 

ERA

Team Winning Percentage

Group 10

.959

 

0.47

.911

Group 9

.860

 

1.25

.786

Group 8

.769

 

1.81

.693

Group 7

.682

 

2.38

.621

Group 6

.593

 

3.01

.557

Group 5

.494

 

3.72

.499

Group 4

.386

 

4.60

.430

Group 3

.268

 

5.71

.360

Group 2

.136

 

7.30

.285

Group 1

.038

 

10.16

.219

Group 0

.003

 

18.52

.133

 

                Because this is true, it would seem to me that it is an entirely reasonable way to determine a pitcher’s value by simply adding up the levels in his games.   The more steps up the ladder he has taken, the more games his team probably has won.

                I would suggest that there are four ways, growing out of this study, to determine who "should" win the Cy Young Award or who should have won the Cy Young Award:

                1)  To look at the Good Game Percentage,

                2)  To add up the levels,

                3)  To look at how far above average the pitcher is (5.00), or

                4)  To look at how far he is above replacement level.

                I can’t see that any one of those methods is clearly better than the others.   Therefore, I would argue that if the Cy Young Award winner ranks as the best pitcher in the league in any of these approaches, that it’s a reasonable selection and should be treated as an accurate selection.   If the Cy Young Award winner doesn’t come out on top by any of these measures, then it is up to somebody else to justify the voting. 

                However, I will note that the Replacement Level theory is not actually applicable to a game-by-game analysis.

 

20.  Leader Lists

                Most Level-10 performances in a season:

Year

First

Last

10s

1963

Sandy

Koufax

20

1965

Sandy

Koufax

18

1968

Bob

Gibson

18

2000

Pedro

Martinez

18

1999

Randy

Johnson

17

 

                Most Level-9 and Level-10 performances in a season:

Year

First

Last

9 and 10

1963

Sandy

Koufax

27

1966

Sandy

Koufax

26

1971

Vida

Blue

26

1965

Sandy

Koufax

25

1972

Steve

Carlton

24

2000

Pedro

Martinez

23

1967

Jim

Bunning

23

 

                The older pitchers have a big advantage here because they were working in a four-man rotation.   Bunning, 1967, is the only pitcher on any of these first lists who didn’t win the Cy Young Award.   Most Level-8, 9 and 10 performances in a season:

Year

First

Last

8 to 10

1966

Sandy

Koufax

31

1986

Mike

Scott

30

1963

Sandy

Koufax

29

1971

Vida

Blue

29

1965

Sandy

Koufax

29

1972

Gaylord

Perry

29

1968

Denny

McLain

29

1999

Randy

Johnson

28

1972

Steve

Carlton

27

1973

Tom

Seaver

27

 

                Most Level-7, 8, 9 and 10 performances in a season

Year

First

Last

7 to 10

1965

Sandy

Koufax

33

1968

Denny

McLain

33

1966

Sandy

Koufax

32

1986

Mike

Scott

31

1963

Sandy

Koufax

31

1972

Gaylord

Perry

31

1971

Ferguson

Jenkins

31

1980

Steve

Carlton

30

1971

Mickey

Lolich

30

 

                Mickey Lolich, 1971. . .second pitcher we have seen who didn’t win the Cy Young Award. 

                Most games started in a season without a Level-7 performance or better:  Steve Blass, 1973, 18.

                Most Level-10 performances in a career:

First

Last

10s

Randy

Johnson

165

Roger

Clemens

163

Nolan

Ryan

156

Tom

Seaver

132

Bert

Blyleven

127

Bob

Gibson

127

Gaylord

Perry

124

Steve

Carlton

124

Ferguson

Jenkins

122

 

                Every pitcher with 100 Level-10 performances in his career is in the Hall of Fame except for Clemens, Pedro and Luis Tiant.   Tiant had exactly 100.    Most Level-9 or Level-10 performances in a career:

First

Last

9 or 10

Roger

Clemens

284

Nolan

Ryan

272

Randy

Johnson

245

Tom

Seaver

230

Gaylord

Perry

225

Steve

Carlton

222

Don

Sutton

209

Greg

Maddux

209

Bob

Gibson

198

Bert

Blyleven

192

Ferguson

Jenkins

192

 

                Most Level-8, Level-9 or Level-10 performances in a career (reminding you that we don’t have complete data for the Warren Spahn/Robin Roberts/Whitey Ford generation:

First

Last

8 or 10

Nolan

Ryan

362

Roger

Clemens

354

Steve

Carlton

312

Gaylord

Perry

310

Tom

Seaver

308

Randy

Johnson

305

Greg

Maddux

299

Don

Sutton

288

Phil

Niekro

268

Bert

Blyleven

262

 

                Most Level-7 and above performances in a career:

First

Last

7 and above

Nolan

Ryan

436

Roger

Clemens

432

Greg

Maddux

383

Steve

Carlton

375

Gaylord

Perry

373

Tom

Seaver

368

Randy

Johnson

365

Don

Sutton

357

Phil

Niekro

338

Bert

Blyleven

336

 

                Highest Average Performance Levels in a season, 20 or more starts:

Year

First

Last

Average

2000

Pedro

Martinez

9.07

1999

Pedro

Martinez

8.66

1968

Bob

Gibson

8.53

1997

Pedro

Martinez

8.45

1995

Greg

Maddux

8.43

2001

Randy

Johnson

8.35

1997

Randy

Johnson

8.21

1999

Randy

Johnson

8.20

1997

Roger

Clemens

8.18

1994

Greg

Maddux

8.16

 

                Highest totals in a season (10 points for "10", 9 points for a "9", etc.):

Year

First

Last

Starts

Total

1965

Sandy

Koufax

41

330

1966

Sandy

Koufax

41

325

1972

Steve

Carlton

41

324

1968

Denny

McLain

41

317

1972

Gaylord

Perry

40

316

1963

Sandy

Koufax

40

312

1972

Wilbur

Wood

49

308

1971

Vida

Blue

39

306

1971

Mickey

Lolich

45

306

1971

Wilbur

Wood

42

300

 

                Furthest above .500 (5.000) in a season:

Year

First

Last

Above 5.0

1965

Sandy

Koufax

125

1966

Sandy

Koufax

120

1968

Bob

Gibson

120

1972

Steve

Carlton

119

2000

Pedro

Martinez

118

1972

Gaylord

Perry

116

2001

Randy

Johnson

114

1963

Sandy

Koufax

112

1968

Denny

McLain

112

1999

Randy

Johnson

112

 

                Furthest below average in a season:

Year

First

Last

Starts

Minus

2005

Jose

Lima

32

-68

1973

Steve

Blass

18

-58

1974

Steve

Arlin

22

-54

1980

Dennis

Lamp

37

-53

2008

Livan

Hernandez

31

-53

1983

Dennis

Martinez

25

-50

1987

Bob

Knepper

31

-50

1979

Ross

Grimsley

27

-50

1977

Wayne

Simpson

23

-49

1979

Dock

Ellis

24

-49

1979

Phil

Huffman

31

-49

2005

Russ

Ortiz

22

-49

 

                Furthest above replacement level in a season:

Year

First

Last

Above 3.00

1965

Sandy

Koufax

207

1966

Sandy

Koufax

202

1972

Steve

Carlton

201

1972

Gaylord

Perry

196

1968

Denny

McLain

194

1963

Sandy

Koufax

192

1971

Vida

Blue

189

1968

Bob

Gibson

188

2001

Randy

Johnson

182

1986

Mike

Scott

182

1999

Randy

Johnson

182

1970

Sam

McDowell

180

 

                Furthest below replacement level:

Year

First

Last

Below 3.00

1973

Steve

Blass

22

1973

Mike

Kekich

17

1983

Rick

Langford

17

2011

Brian

Matusz

16

1996

Todd

VanPoppel

15

1992

Ryan

Bowen

15

1988

Steve

Trout

14

2006

Joe

Mays

14

2000

Jaime

Navarro

14

2002

Jaret

Wright

14

2003

Nick

Bierbrodt

14

1973

Lloyd

Allen

14

 

Highest average performance levels in a career, 100 or more starts:

First

Last

Average

Pedro

Martinez

7.05

Randy

Johnson

6.78

Clayton

Kershaw

6.76

Roger

Clemens

6.75

Sandy

Koufax

6.73

Bob

Gibson

6.72

Curt

Schilling

6.69

Johan

Santana

6.65

Tom

Seaver

6.52

Justin

Verlander

6.38

 

                Lowest average performance level in a career, 100 or more starts:

First

Last

Average

Mike

Kekich

3.84

Bill

Champion

3.86

Brian

Meadows

3.87

Jeff

Ballard

3.92

John

Halama

3.93

Sean

Bergman

3.99

Russ

Kemmerer

4.00

Pete

Redfern

4.02

Wade

Blasingame

4.03

Randy

Lerch

4.04

 

                Highest Good Game Percentages, 100 or more starts:

First

Last

Good Games

Poor Games

Pct.

Pedro

Martinez

290

91

.761

Clayton

Kershaw

128

41

.757

Randy

Johnson

414

145

.741

Roger

Clemens

480

173

.735

Curt

Schilling

293

110

.727

Mark

Prior

69

26

.726

Johan

Santana

185

70

.725

Jered

Weaver

153

61

.715

Tom

Seaver

419

171

.710

David

Price

95

39

.709

Bob

Gibson

319

131

.709

Kerry

Wood

116

48

.707

Sandy

Koufax

205

87

.702

 

 

21.  Mike Garcia, 1954

                Mike Garcia in 1954 was 19-8 with a league-leading 2.64 ERA—but never beat a team with a .500 or better record.  Other than Garcia, the most wins by any pitcher in my data who never beat a .500 or better team was 13; Garcia was at 19.

                Garcia’s team, the 1954 Indians, was so good that they kept most of the rest of the league under .500.   Other than the Indians, there were only two teams in the league with winning records—the Yankees (103-51) and the White Sox (94-60).   Garcia didn’t beat either of those teams, and nobody else in the league was better than 69-85.   So Garcia won 19 games, but never beat an opponent with a won-lost record better than 69-85.

 
 

COMMENTS (9 Comments, most recent shown first)

hotstatrat
The 1968 McLain-Gibsron rivalry takes another breath here in the "Furthest above replacement level in a season".
7:25 PM Jun 19th
 
evanecurb
The 1954 Indians lost 43 games - 22 to the White Sox and Yankees and 21 to the other five teams.

5:45 PM Jun 18th
 
tangotiger
Chuck: the baseball reference WAR *does* take into account opponent hitters (plus team fielders, and parks).
3:27 PM Jun 18th
 
chuck
But it would be taking into account the level of opposition, which the WAR doesn't, as far as I know. As to it being instructive, does that mean the results for the Palmers, McNallys, etc are not instructive?​
1:34 PM Jun 18th
 
MWeddell
Rick Reuschel has a much higher than most would expect career WAR: 31st among pitchers at Fangraphs.com and 34th among pitchers at Baseball-Reference.com. To the best of my knowledge, the reason why he ranks higher than expected is that both versions of WAR assert that Reuschel played in front of some horrible defenses during his career, primarily the 1970s Cubs teams.

Given that Bill James' 10-level method makes no adjustments for defense, I'm not sure that a comparison to the surprisingly high WAR totals will be instructive.
1:06 PM Jun 18th
 
chuck
First of all, I love the series- the topic, the approach, the findings, and as always, the writing, which always gives that feeling of being talked to. I ran across a Ben Franklin quote yesterday: "If you would not be forgotten as soon as you are dead and rotten, either write something worth reading or do things worth the writing." I think you've scored on both of those for the past 40 years.

For those of us with a persistent fascination with and disagreement about Rick Reuschel, can you tell us how he does in this system? Average game start, cumulative score, hopefully even a breakdown of how many starts at each level?
Others that would be interesting to see results for: Morris, Hunter, Bob Friend, Matt Cain, and Ned Garver.
11:38 AM Jun 18th
 
337
Is this metric saying that Koufax's best three seasons, IN ORDER, are 1965, then 1966, then 1963? Or is that still a live issue?
10:52 AM Jun 18th
 
TudorFever
Mike Garcia's usage against the Yankees in 1954 was weird. He lost 3 games to them but had 3 saves. He had 9 appearances against them, out of 22 games: 4 starts and 5 in relief.
9:24 AM Jun 18th
 
77royals
Hi Bill, would this method work for the post-season, or is it too much of a small sample size?
6:32 AM Jun 18th
 
 
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