The Better League, 4

June 9, 2022
                                                              The Better League, 4

The Star Population

 

              I believe it to be characteristic of a superior league that a stronger league has more long-term stars than a weaker league.   You are free to agree or disagree, but this is what I believe.

            Of course, single-season statistics are balanced within every league, the successes and failures of that league being even except for interleague play.   However, suppose that in comparing two leagues one league has "stars" who just pop up and fade away, whereas the other league has more players who are good or great every year.  Do we regard these leagues as even, or uneven?  I regard the league with the larger population of enduring stars as probably the superior league. 

            So, how do we count them?   Using Win Shares again; it’s what I have in an organized form.   My rules here are:

1) No player is counted as a long-term star in any season in which he has fewer than 15 Win Shares.   Henry Aaron earned 13 Win Shares in 1954, when he was 20-year-old rookie, and 13 in 1974, when he was a 40-year old veteran who hit .268 with 20 homers in 112 games.   He drove in 69 runs in each of those seasons.  That’s not a star player; that’s a fellow who will be a star player later, or who used to be a superstar and also broke one of baseball’s greatest records that season, but that’s not really relevant to how great a player he is.   15 Win Shares, you can be listed as a long-term star if you otherwise qualify; 14, you can’t.   Miguel Cabrera no longer counts as a long-term star, because having Miguel Cabrera in the league is no longer evidence that the American League is a strong league. 

2) To qualify as a long-term star, a player must have at least 200 Win Career Shares.   At 200 Win Shares, however, he counts as a 1-point contributor to the League Long-Term Stars Collection (LLTSC).  I’ll also call it "Star Weight". 

For a catcher, the formula sets the player’s level is int[(CWS – 185) / 15], where CWS stands for Career Win Shares, and int means "Integer".  So a catcher is a 1-point contributor to the League Star Weight if his career Win Shares are 200-214, a 2-point contributor at 215-229 Win Shares, a 3-point contributor at 230-244, a 4-point contributor at 245-259, etc. 

Any position player who is not primarily a catcher is evaluated by the formula int[(CWS – 180) / 20], so he is a one-point contributor in the range of 200 to 219, a 2-point contributor in the range of 220 to 239, a 3-point contributor in the range of 240 to 259, a 4-point contributor in the range of 260 to 279, etc. 

A pitcher is evaluated by the formula int[(CWS – 182) / 18], so he is a one-point contributor in the range of 200 to 217, a 2-point contributor in the range fo 218 to 235, a 3-point contributor in the range of 236 to 253, a 4-point contributor in the range of 254 to 271, etc. 

When a player starts his career as a catcher but moves in mid-career, like Joe Torre, Craig Biggio, or BJ Surhoff, his stature is figured as a "something else".  Obviously Ted Simmons and Johnny Bench and guys like that, a year somewhere else at the end of their careers, are figured as catchers. 

Supplementing those formulas, I gave "grants" to players like Ted Willilams, Bobby Feller and others who were bigger stars than is suggested by their Career Win Shares total because of military service interruptions, and to players whose careers were delayed by racial prejudice, but who managed to become stars and superstars anyway.  There were 34 players who were given grants to register them as higher-impact stars than they otherwise appear to be.  I’ll mark these as "M" for military service, and "R" for racial bias.   The 34 players are:

 

            Luke Appling (M, 2 points)

            Roy Campanella (R, 1 point)

            Murry Dickson (M, 2 points)

            Dom DiMaggio (M, 3 points)

            Joe DiMaggio (M, 3 points)

            Larry Doby (M and R, 3 points)

Bobby Doerr (M, 1 point)

Bob Feller (M, 4 points)

Whitey Ford (M, 2 points)

Joe Gordon (M, 2 points)

 

Hank Greenberg (M, 5 points)

Dick Groat (M, 2 points)

Tommy Henrich (M, 3 points)

Billy Herman (M, 2 points)

Elston Howard (R, 2 points)

Eddie Joost (M, 2 points)

Charlie Keller (M, 2 points)

Bob Lemon (M, 2 points)

Willie Mays (M, 2 points)

Minnie Minoso (R, 4 points)

 

Johnny Mize (M, 3 points)

Pee Wee Reese (M, 3 points)

Phil Rizzuto (M, 3 points)

Jackie Robinson (M and R, 5 points)

Red Ruffing (M, 3 points)

Curt Simmons (M, 1 point)

Enos Slaughter (M, 3 points)

Warren Spahn (M, 3 points)

Arky Vaughan (M, 2 points)

Mickey Vernon (M, 2 points)

 

Bill White (M, 2 points)

Ted Williams (M, 5 points)

Gene Woodling (M, 1 point)

Early Wynn (M, 1 point)

 

            My understanding is that Eddie Joost and Arky Vaughan did not actually serve in the military, but that their careers were interrupted by taking jobs in vital industries due to war-time laws.   The "grants" here generally UNDERSTATE what the player lost.  Ted Williams and Jackie Robinson almost certainly lost MORE than 100 career Win Shares.  This is consistent with my general philosophy that it is often better to half-solve a problem than to try to completely solve it.  You half-solve a problem, you’re in a better position; you try to COMPLETELY compensate every player for every loss, then you create other problems as large as the one you are trying to solve. 

In baseball history there are 6,816 player/seasons in which the player is considered to be a long-term star of at least very modest quality.  The biggest stars in baseball history, by this process, are:

            Babe Ruth, Level 28

            Ty Cobb, 27

            Barry Bonds, 26

            Cy Young, 25

            Willie Mays, 25

            Honus Wagner, 23

            Ted Williams, 23

            Hank Aaron, 23

            Tris Speaker, 22

            Stan Musial, 22

            Walter Johnson, 21

 

To take, for example, the 1980 season.  In the 1980 season the American League had 32 long-term stars who had contributing seasons, with a total "star weight" of 193 points:

 

Rickey

Henderson

17

Reggie

Jackson

13

George

Brett

12

Carlton

Fisk

12

Eddie

Murray

12

Robin

Yount

12

Paul

Molitor

11

Rod

Carew

10

Dwight

Evans

8

Bobby

Grich

7

Buddy

Bell

6

Al

Oliver

6

Willie

Randolph

6

Ken

Singleton

6

Alan

Trammell

6

Toby

Harrah

5

Tommy

John

5

Fred

Lynn

5

Jim

Rice

5

Chet

Lemon

4

Lance

Parrish

4

Cecil

Cooper

3

Jerry

Koosman

3

Carney

Lansford

3

Goose

Gossage

2

Hal

McRae

2

Bob

Watson

2

Willie

Wilson

2

Doug

DeCinces

1

Mike

Hargrove

1

Dave

Stieb

1

Jim

Sundberg

1

 

The National League in 1980 had 35 contributing stars, with a total star weight of 224 points. 

           

Pete

Rose

18

Joe

Morgan

16

Mike

Schmidt

14

Johnny

Bench

11

Dave

Winfield

11

Steve

Carlton

10

Gary

Carter

10

Phil

Niekro

10

Darrell

Evans

9

Andre

Dawson

8

Ted

Simmons

8

Dave

Parker

7

Ozzie

Smith

7

Reggie

Smith

7

Don

Sutton

7

Jack

Clark

6

Jose

Cruz

6

Keith

Hernandez

6

Cesar

Cedeno

5

Ron

Cey

5

Dale

Murphy

5

Dave

Concepcion

4

George

Foster

4

Steve

Garvey

4

Dusty

Baker

3

Ken (Sr.)

Griffey

3

Davey

Lopes

3

Gary

Matthews

3

Rick

Reuschel

3

Gene

Tenace

3

Bill

Buckner

2

Chris

Chambliss

2

George

Hendrick

2

Vida

Blue

1

Garry

Templeton

1

 

We could also figure by this method the "star weight" of every TEAM in history.  Maybe another time.   The historical average is 15.09 star points per team.  If your team has 15 points of star weight, you’re average. Also noted. .I think that if you count magazine covers from that era, I’m pretty sure you will  confirm the conclusion that, in that era and throughout his career, Pete Rose was a bigger star than Mike Schmidt, Joe Morgan or anyone else in the league.   Much more was written about Rose than about any other player. 

Tom Seaver did not have a contributing season in 1980, if you are wondering.   He pitched 188 innings, was 10-8 with a 3.64 ERA.  That’s not good enough to say that Tom Seaver being in that league is evidence of the strength of the league, because Seaver in that season is just an ordinary guy.   Seaver is a Level-11 star in his normal seasons. 

In 1980, the National League is shown as having a few more long-term stars and higher-impact stars, but it’s close.   Throughout much of history, is ISN’T close; it isn’t close at all. 

Summarizing history:  The National League started with almost no long-term stars as we would calculate it, in part because anything that happened before 1876 doesn’t count in this system, and in part because their seasons were so short that few players earned 15 or more Win Shares.   We credit the National League with a star weight of 9 points in 1876.

This number increased rapidly, up to 100 points by 1881.  Throughout the 1880s, the National League always had far, far more stars than its competitor, the American Association, by counts like 105-18 (1882), 125-50 (1884), 144-46 (1886), and 177-53 (1889).  The American Association never came close to catching up to the National League in this regard. 

In 1890 the Players formed their own league, the Player’s League.  The Player’s League claimed a little over half of the star power, leading the star count 24-17, and leading in Star Weight, 125-114.  The American Association lost almost all of their stars, being left with two contributing stars (Jack Stivetts and Cupid Childs) and a Star Weight of just 7 points.  It’s really a two-league battle, not a three-league battle.  In 1891 the Player’s League folded, and the NL outscores the American Association by the usual 218-57 score.  

After the 1891 season the American Association folded, with four of the American Association teams joining the National League.  The National League in the years 1892-1899 has the highest ratios of stars to teams of any league in baseball history.  The reason this happens is that it is a "compressed talent" league.   All the stars from the 1880s, both leagues. . .all of those who are good enough to carry on their careers are in the National League.  On the other end, the same thing is true only working backward; many of the National League’s young and hungry stars from the late 1890s went on to long careers, thus high scores, in the American League.  The result is that the National League has very high ratios of stars per team at the beginning of the 1892-1899 era, and at the end of it.  In the middle, their star ratios drop down to historically normal levels. 

In 1900 the National League cut down to eight teams, with the result that the National League in 1900 has a star weight of 219 points on just eight teams, the highest ratio of star weight to teams in baseball history (27.4 star points per team.)   In 1901 the National League completely dominated the American League in Star Points (212-85), but by 1902 the American League had vaulted ahead (149-118), due to defections of stars to the American League, which was paying somewhat higher salaries. 

You may remember that earlier in this series I stated that the American League did not attract SOME of the National League’s stars; it attracted MOST of the National League’s stars.  When I said that I was just speaking observationally; I had not done actual analysis to show that that was true.  This analysis confirms that what I believed to be true anyway WAS true; the American League by 1902 DID have most of the stars, over half. 

The American League then led the "Star Weight Competition" by narrow margins in 1902, 1903 and 1904.  The National League then moved back ahead by narrow margins in 1905 and 1906.   It can generally be said that the numbers of long-term stars were about equal between the two leagues from 1902 to 1906.

But the American League was coming up with guys like Ty Cobb, Tris Speaker, Walter Johnson, Eddie Collins and Home Run Baker.   The National League wasn’t.   The American League moved ahead of the NL in star weight in 1907, and stayed ahead for a long, long, long time.   The American League has more long-term stars than the National League in every single season from 1907 to 1942, and many times the margin is HUGE.  The American League is so far ahead in some seasons that if you don’t count Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Walter Johnson and Tris Speaker, they’re still ahead.   The margins over the years included 178-117 (1910), 199-88 (1919), 203-98 (1922), 192-96 (1925), 205-110 (1926), 178-102 (1933), and 166-93 (1939).  The American League throughout all of that era is just far, far ahead in terms of its star power.

The numbers in both leagues dropped very sharply during World War II, dropping from a total (both leagues) of 252 in 1941 to 250 in 1942, 155 in 1943, 102 in 1944, and 90 in 1945. 

The National League is slightly ahead from 1943-1945.  In 1946 the numbers mostly recovered, and the American League, with the return of Williams and Feller and DiMaggio and Greenberg, immediately jumped back ahead, although not by the huge margins of the 1907-1941 era.   The American League is ahead in the 1946-1949 era, but the National League is gaining on them.  In 1950 the NL shows as being slightly ahead; in the 1951, the AL moves back a little bit ahead. 

In 1952 the National League takes over, and the National League rules for almost as long as the American League had ruled.   The National League had more long-term stars in their midst in 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, etc., until 1982—and many of the margins are enormous.   You will note that this is essentially identical to the conclusion reached in Better League 1, the first of these daily analytical probes of the subject. 

The margins started out significant (130-97 in 1953, 129-98 in 1954) and grew steadily.   In 1958 it was 167-114, in 1962 210-109, in 1963 237-97, in 1965 252-124, in 1967 258-145, in 1969 274-165. 

In 1971 the National League had a "star weight" of 287 points, an all-time record.   There were 36 long-term stars in the National League, a list which follows with the weight that we assign to each star:

 

Hank

Aaron

23

Willie

Mays

23

 

 

 

Pete

Rose

18

Joe

Morgan

16

 

 

 

Johnny

Bench

11

Willie

McCovey

11

Tom

Seaver

11

Steve

Carlton

10

Phil

Niekro

10

Gaylord

Perry

10

 

 

 

Roberto

Clemente

9

Willie

Stargell

9

Billy

Williams

9

Dick

Allen

8

Lou

Brock

8

Tony

Perez

8

Ted

Simmons

8

Rusty

Staub

8

 

 

 

Willie

Davis

7

Bob

Gibson

7

Fergie

Jenkins

7

Ron

Santo

7

Don

Sutton

7

Bobby

Bonds

6

Al

Oliver

6

Joe

Torre

6

 

 

 

Cesar

Cedeno

5

Ron

Fairly

4

Juan

Marichal

4

Maury

Wills

3

 

 

 

Lee

May

2

Bob

Watson

2

Richie

Hebner

1

Tim

McCarver

1

Milt

Pappas

1

Chris

Speier

1

 

No other league has ever had that many stars of that quality.   The American League was doing OK, too; they had 177 points of star weight, an OK number if you don’t compare it to the National League.  Beginning in 1972 the American League began to catch up rapidly, due to the talent explosions in Boston, Baltimore and Oakland, and to the National League gradually losing some of its long-term superstars like Mays, Aaron, Clemente and Bob Gibson.   By 1975 the leagues were nearly even. 

In 1982 the American League finally pulled ahead, and solidly ahead (257-202).  The American League then remained ahead until 1997, with the exception of a small advantage for the National League in the 1994 strike season. 

The NL pulled ahead in 2001 and led until 2005, sometime by wide margins, reaching 245-147 in 2004.  I don’t quite know what to do with that information, since I don’t think that most other indicators will show the National League to be the stronger league in 2004, but what do you do with information you can’t fit into your neural network?  You take it for what it is. 

By 2006 the American League is back ahead.  After 2006 the quality of information here begins to degrade rapidly.   You can’t compare the two leagues in this way in 2021, because you can’t put an accurate or reasonably-accurate grade on anyone.   Nolan Arenado, Mookie Betts and Aaron Judge don’t register as long-term stars yet, although obviously they will when their careers are complete.   Freddie Freeman and Paul Goldschmidt register as long-term stars now, but are still rapidly climbing the ladder.   You just can’t get any reliable information for 2021.  To make this work—that is, to avoid having zeroes for those years--I just had to plaster in numbers for the last 10-12 years, based on over-interpreting what information I have to work with. 

 

            Now, since we have decided to state all of these scraps of information on a .500 scale, how do state this on a .500 scale?           

            The historical average is 15.09 points of star weight per team.   Let us assume that if your league had zero star weight—and every league in history has at least SOME star weight—but let us assume that if you were at zero, you would have a .200 league.   Let us assume, then, that for every point of star weight per team, your league’s presumptive strength increases by .020.  Then an average league should score at .500.  Actually, the number that gets us to .500 for an average league is .01925.  

            The National League in 1971 had 23.92 points of star weight per team.  Multipy that by .01925, add .200, and you’re at .660, so the National League in 1971 is given a presumptive strength indicator, based on the number and quality of long-term stars playing in the league, of .660.   The American League the same year was at .484. 

            This chart summarizes the star-strength of each league each season, with the strongest league of the decade highlighted in blue, and the weakest of each decade marked in red.   Well, pink:

 

Season

League

Score

1876

NL

.222

1877

NL

.229

1878

NL

.264

1879

NL

.325

1880

NL

.371

1881

NL

.441

1882

NL

.453

1882

AA

.258

1883

NL

.460

1883

AA

.282

1884

NL

.501

1884

AA

.280

1884

UA

.207

1885

NL

.486

1885

AA

.265

1886

NL

.547

1886

AA

.311

1887

NL

.587

1887

AA

.308

1888

NL

.587

1888

AA

.299

1889

NL

.626

1889

AA

.328

1890

PL

.501

1890

NL

.474

1890

AA

.217

1891

NL

.725

1891

AA

.337

1892

NL

.648

1893

NL

.566

1894

NL

.505

1895

NL

.503

1896

NL

.506

1897

NL

.556

1898

NL

.627

1899

NL

.607

1900

NL

.727

1901

NL

.710

1901

AL

.405

1902

AL

.559

1902

NL

.484

1903

AL

.537

1903

NL

.494

1904

AL

.551

1904

NL

.518

1905

NL

.515

1905

AL

.506

1906

AL

.530

1906

NL

.508

1907

AL

.556

1907

NL

.474

1908

AL

.559

1908

NL

.518

1909

AL

.585

1909

NL

.455

1910

AL

.628

1910

NL

.482

1911

AL

.563

1911

NL

.496

1912

AL

.590

1912

NL

.482

1913

AL

.592

1913

NL

.513

1914

AL

.568

1914

NL

.508

1914

FL

.248

1915

AL

.607

1915

NL

.443

1915

FL

.270

1916

AL

.660

1916

NL

.527

1917

AL

.681

1917

NL

.477

1918

AL

.578

1918

NL

.393

1919

AL

.679

1919

NL

.412

1920

AL

.636

1920

NL

.496

1921

AL

.684

1921

NL

.470

1922

AL

.688

1922

NL

.436

1923

AL

.664

1923

NL

.486

1924

AL

.669

1924

NL

.467

1925

AL

.667

1925

NL

.462

1926

AL

.662

1926

NL

.431

1927

AL

.693

1927

NL

.465

1928

AL

.609

1928

NL

.515

1929

AL

.626

1929

NL

.467

1930

AL

.602

1930

NL

.465

1931

AL

.547

1931

NL

.474

1932

AL

.575

1932

NL

.433

1933

AL

.628

1933

NL

.445

1934

AL

.578

1934

NL

.465

1935

AL

.539

1935

NL

.455

1936

AL

.530

1936

NL

.470

1937

AL

.527

1937

NL

.455

1938

AL

.561

1938

NL

.455

1939

AL

.599

1939

NL

.424

1940

AL

.563

1940

NL

.429

1941

AL

.563

1941

NL

.443

1942

AL

.501

1942

NL

.501

1943

NL

.405

1943

AL

.368

1944

NL

.361

1944

AL

.284

1945

NL

.318

1945

AL

.299

1946

AL

.470

1946

NL

.409

1947

AL

.477

1947

NL

.445

1948

AL

.494

1948

NL

.424

1949

AL

.503

1949

NL

.474

1950

NL

.486

1950

AL

.479

1951

AL

.520

1951

NL

.510

1952

NL

.513

1952

AL

.433

1953

NL

.510

1953

AL

.436

1954

NL

.556

1954

AL

.465

1955

NL

.566

1955

AL

.508

1956

NL

.614

1956

AL

.518

1957

NL

.599

1957

AL

.472

1958

NL

.602

1958

AL

.474

1959

NL

.544

1959

AL

.477

1960

NL

.578

1960

AL

.532

1961

NL

.624

1961

AL

.408

1962

NL

.604

1962

AL

.410

1963

NL

.656

1963

AL

.387

1964

NL

.606

1964

AL

.456

1965

NL

.685

1965

AL

.439

1966

NL

.677

1966

AL

.477

1967

NL

.697

1967

AL

.479

1968

NL

.716

1968

AL

.504

1969

NL

.640

1969

AL

.465

1970

NL

.598

1970

AL

.474

1971

NL

.660

1971

AL

.484

1972

NL

.603

1972

AL

.503

1973

NL

.622

1973

AL

.505

1974

NL

.627

1974

AL

.530

1975

NL

.607

1975

AL

.564

1976

NL

.558

1976

AL

.538

1977

NL

.596

1977

AL

.496

1978

NL

.620

1978

AL

.527

1979

NL

.572

1979

AL

.460

1980

NL

.559

1980

AL

.465

1981

NL

.405

1981

AL

.349

1982

AL

.553

1982

NL

.524

1983

AL

.523

1983

NL

.441

1984

AL

.511

1984

NL

.404

1985

AL

.553

1985

NL

.429

1986

AL

.505

1986

NL

.425

1987

AL

.527

1987

NL

.449

1988

AL

.530

1988

NL

.453

1989

AL

.501

1989

NL

.484

1990

AL

.525

1990

NL

.487

1991

AL

.515

1991

NL

.529

1992

AL

.519

1992

NL

.540

1993

AL

.490

1993

NL

.485

1994

NL

.423

1994

AL

.412

1995

AL

.500

1995

NL

.437

1996

AL

.522

1996

NL

.503

1997

AL

.530

1997

NL

.472

1998

NL

.490

1998

AL

.526

1999

NL

.518

1999

AL

.500

2000

NL

.488

2000

AL

.494

2001

NL

.498

2001

AL

.468

2002

NL

.512

2002

AL

.460

2003

NL

.485

2003

AL

.441

2004

NL

.495

2004

AL

.402

2005

NL

.445

2005

AL

.394

2006

AL

.460

2006

NL

.420

2007

NL

.432

2007

AL

.456

2008

AL

.476

2008

NL

.414

2009

AL

.519

2009

NL

.481

2010

AL

.541

2010

NL

.459

2011

NL

.490

2011

AL

.510

2012

AL

.537

2012

NL

.463

2013

AL

.505

2013

NL

.495

2014

AL

.513

2014

NL

.487

2015

AL

.536

2015

NL

.464

2016

AL

.525

2016

NL

.475

2017

AL

.507

2017

NL

.493

2018

NL

.502

2018

AL

.498

2019

NL

.506

2019

AL

.494

2020

AL

.500

2020

NL

.500

2021

AL

.500

2021

NL

.500

 

            And this chart summarizes all four of the indicators we have so far created.  In this chart, the blue/red highlighting is used to indicate years in which one league appears to be at least 75 points (.075) stronger than the other.  Green highlighting is used to indicate transitions in power between the leagues, or periods of balance when the leagues are almost even, and yellow highlighting is used for those leagues in which the league’s four-indicator strength index is less than .400.   My thanks to reader Bearbyz, who called my attention to an error in the BL3 column in the work posted yesterday.  

 

Season

League

BL1

BL2

BL3

BL4

Total

1876

NL

.500

.452

.450

.222

.406

1877

NL

.500

.447

.450

.229

.406

1878

NL

.500

.351

.450

.264

.391

1879

NL

.519

.398

.450

.325

.423

1880

NL

.533

.390

.450

.371

.436

1881

NL

.533

.452

.450

.441

.469

1882

AA

.439

.452

.450

.258

.400

1882

NL

.547

.493

.450

.453

.486

1883

AA

.433

.509

.450

.282

.418

1883

NL

.559

.499

.450

.460

.492

1884

AA

.403

.454

.450

.280

.397

1884

NL

.592

.484

.450

.501

.507

1884

UA

.500

.411

.450

.207

.392

1885

AA

.437

.466

.450

.265

.404

1885

NL

.562

.478

.450

.486

.494

1886

AA

.449

.448

.450

.311

.415

1886

NL

.551

.487

.450

.547

.509

1887

AA

.410

.410

.450

.308

.395

1887

NL

.589

.471

.450

.587

.524

1888

AA

.421

.416

.450

.299

.396

1888

NL

.578

.463

.450

.587

.520

1889

AA

.414

.449

.450

.328

.410

1889

NL

.583

.480

.450

.626

.535

1890

AA

.437

.446

.450

.217

.387

1890

NL

.559

.441

.450

.474

.481

1890

PL

.500

.482

.450

.501

.483

1891

AA

.429

.464

.450

.337

.420

1891

NL

.561

.468

.450

.725

.551

1892

NL

.554

.480

.450

.648

.533

1893

NL

.532

.485

.450

.566

.508

1894

NL

.515

.500

.450

.505

.492

1895

NL

.500

.502

.450

.503

.489

1896

NL

.500

.506

.450

.506

.491

1897

NL

.500

.500

.450

.556

.502

1898

NL

.489

.506

.450

.627

.518

1899

NL

.479

.504

.450

.607

.510

1900

NL

.486

.512

.450

.727

.544

1901

AL

.520

.505

.450

.405

.470

1901

NL

.484

.505

.450

.710

.537

1902

AL

.504

.519

.450

.559

.508

1902

NL

.497

.508

.450

.484

.485

1903

AL

.508

.517

.450

.537

.503

1903

NL

.493

.517

.450

.494

.488

1904

AL

.458

.519

.450

.551

.495

1904

NL

.540

.508

.450

.518

.504

1905

AL

.425

.519

.450

.506

.475

1905

NL

.574

.508

.450

.515

.512

1906

AL

.470

.509

.450

.530

.490

1906

NL

.530

.498

.450

.508

.496

1907

AL

.421

.496

.450

.556

.481

1907

NL

.579

.496

.450

.474

.500

1908

AL

.446

.499

.450

.559

.489

1908

NL

.554

.491

.450

.518

.503

1909

AL

.479

.474

.450

.585

.497

1909

NL

.521

.497

.450

.455

.481

1910

AL

.533

.477

.450

.628

.522

1910

NL

.467

.501

.450

.482

.475

1911

AL

.549

.489

.450

.563

.513

1911

NL

.451

.507

.450

.496

.476

1912

AL

.557

.481

.450

.590

.519

1912

NL

.443

.501

.450

.482

.469

1913

AL

.591

.479

.450

.592

.528

1913

NL

.409

.505

.450

.513

.469

1914

AL

.543

.485

.450

.568

.512

1914

FL

.500

.513

.450

.248

.428

1914

NL

.457

.491

.450

.508

.477

1915

AL

.601

.494

.450

.607

.538

1915

FL

.500

.514

.450

.270

.433

1915

NL

.399

.502

.450

.443

.449

1916

AL

.595

.505

.450

.660

.552

1916

NL

.405

.507

.450

.527

.472

1917

AL

.571

.524

.450

.681

.556

1917

NL

.429

.516

.450

.477

.468

1918

AL

.556

.520

.450

.578

.526

1918

NL

.444

.512

.450

.393

.450

1919

AL

.513

.527

.450

.679

.542

1919

NL

.487

.520

.450

.412

.467

1920

AL

.535

.525

.450

.636

.536

1920

NL

.465

.523

.450

.496

.484

1921

AL

.483

.517

.450

.684

.533

1921

NL

.517

.523

.450

.470

.490

1922

AL

.462

.508

.450

.688

.527

1922

NL

.538

.511

.450

.436

.484

1923

AL

.514

.510

.450

.664

.535

1923

NL

.486

.506

.450

.486

.482

1924

AL

.524

.504

.450

.669

.537

1924

NL

.476

.506

.450

.467

.475

1925

AL

.533

.499

.450

.667

.537

1925

NL

.467

.505

.450

.462

.471

1926

AL

.552

.500

.450

.662

.541

1926

NL

.448

.504

.450

.431

.458

1927

AL

.625

.489

.450

.693

.564

1927

NL

.375

.494

.450

.465

.446

1928

AL

.653

.492

.450

.609

.551

1928

NL

.347

.487

.450

.515

.450

1929

AL

.651

.495

.450

.626

.556

1929

NL

.349

.491

.450

.467

.439

1930

AL

.647

.497

.450

.602

.549

1930

NL

.353

.502

.450

.465

.442

1931

AL

.626

.501

.450

.547

.531

1931

NL

.374

.502

.450

.474

.450

1932

AL

.670

.504

.450

.575

.550

1932

NL

.330

.494

.450

.433

.427

1933

AL

.664

.510

.450

.628

.563

1933

NL

.336

.498

.450

.445

.432

1934

AL

.635

.505

.450

.578

.542

1934

NL

.365

.501

.450

.465

.445

1935

AL

.651

.518

.450

.539

.540

1935

NL

.349

.498

.450

.455

.438

1936

AL

.623

.507

.450

.530

.527

1936

NL

.377

.516

.450

.470

.453

1937

AL

.648

.505

.450

.527

.533

1937

NL

.352

.517

.450

.455

.444

1938

AL

.621

.486

.450

.561

.529

1938

NL

.379

.520

.450

.455

.451

1939

AL

.625

.472

.450

.599

.537

1939

NL

.375

.519

.450

.424

.442

1940

AL

.548

.481

.450

.563

.510

1940

NL

.452

.503

.450

.429

.458

1941

AL

.556

.494

.450

.563

.516

1941

NL

.444

.495

.450

.443

.458

1942

AL

.536

.497

.450

.501

.496

1942

NL

.464

.497

.450

.501

.478

1943

AL

.567

.502

.450

.368

.472

1943

NL

.433

.509

.450

.405

.449

1944

AL

.519

.489

.450

.284

.436

1944

NL

.481

.503

.450

.361

.449

1945

AL

.561

.472

.450

.299

.445

1945

NL

.439

.487

.450

.318

.423

1946

AL

.579

.510

.450

.470

.502

1946

NL

.421

.503

.450

.409

.446

1947

AL

.602

.512

.450

.477

.510

1947

NL

.398

.505

.455

.445

.451

1948

AL

.614

.511

.455

.494

.518

1948

NL

.386

.493

.460

.424

.441

1949

AL

.614

.496

.455

.503

.517

1949

NL

.386

.505

.470

.474

.459

1950

AL

.582

.506

.460

.479

.507

1950

NL

.418

.505

.481

.486

.473

1951

AL

.540

.507

.470

.520

.509

1951

NL

.460

.502

.486

.510

.490

1952

AL

.508

.494

.476

.433

.478

1952

NL

.492

.504

.476

.513

.496

1953

AL

.494

.496

.465

.436

.473

1953

NL

.506

.508

.481

.510

.501

1954

AL

.466

.500

.476

.465

.476

1954

NL

.534

.511

.511

.556

.528

1955

AL

.450

.496

.486

.508

.485

1955

NL

.550

.511

.522

.566

.537

1956

AL

.462

.502

.491

.518

.493

1956

NL

.538

.499

.532

.614

.546

1957

AL

.478

.505

.486

.472

.485

1957

NL

.522

.492

.522

.599

.534

1958

AL

.485

.501

.486

.474

.487

1958

NL

.515

.499

.552

.602

.542

1959

AL

.450

.499

.486

.477

.478

1959

NL

.550

.502

.557

.544

.538

1960

AL

.425

.499

.491

.532

.487

1960

NL

.575

.495

.557

.578

.551

1961

AL

.448

.508

.524

.408

.472

1961

NL

.552

.487

.557

.624

.555

1962

AL

.439

.512

.533

.410

.473

1962

NL

.561

.497

.557

.604

.555

1963

AL

.384

.507

.528

.387

.452

1963

NL

.616

.489

.557

.656

.580

1964

AL

.395

.495

.533

.456

.470

1964

NL

.605

.498

.557

.606

.567

1965

AL

.399

.485

.541

.439

.466

1965

NL

.601

.497

.557

.685

.585

1966

AL

.433

.494

.549

.477

.488

1966

NL

.567

.503

.557

.677

.576

1967

AL

.410

.502

.549

.479

.485

1967

NL

.590

.507

.557

.697

.588

1968

AL

.428

.513

.557

.504

.500

1968

NL

.572

.511

.557

.716

.589

1969

AL

.419

.514

.557

.465

.489

1969

NL

.581

.498

.557

.640

.569

1970

AL

.463

.514

.557

.474

.502

1970

NL

.538

.495

.557

.598

.547

1971

AL

.463

.507

.557

.484

.503

1971

NL

.537

.496

.557

.660

.563

1972

AL

.448

.512

.557

.503

.505

1972

NL

.552

.491

.557

.603

.551

1973

AL

.446

.503

.557

.505

.503

1973

NL

.554

.505

.557

.622

.560

1974

AL

.448

.498

.557

.530

.509

1974

NL

.552

.510

.557

.627

.561

1975

AL

.415

.494

.557

.564

.508

1975

NL

.585

.513

.557

.607

.566

1976

AL

.377

.503

.557

.538

.494

1976

NL

.623

.517

.557

.558

.564

1977

AL

.404

.506

.557

.496

.491

1977

NL

.596

.512

.557

.596

.566

1978

AL

.405

.503

.557

.527

.498

1978

NL

.595

.508

.557

.620

.570

1979

AL

.393

.507

.557

.460

.479

1979

NL

.607

.507

.557

.572

.561

1980

AL

.393

.507

.557

.465

.481

1980

NL

.607

.509

.557

.559

.558

1981

AL

.412

.515

.557

.349

.458

1981

NL

.588

.501

.557

.405

.513

1982

AL

.441

.503

.557

.553

.514

1982

NL

.559

.497

.557

.524

.534

1983

AL

.503

.507

.557

.523

.522

1983

NL

.498

.501

.557

.441

.499

1984

AL

.500

.502

.557

.511

.518

1984

NL

.500

.503

.557

.404

.491

1985

AL

.502

.499

.557

.553

.528

1985

NL

.498

.502

.557

.429

.497

1986

AL

.527

.494

.557

.505

.521

1986

NL

.473

.506

.557

.425

.490

1987

AL

.530

.501

.557

.527

.529

1987

NL

.470

.513

.557

.449

.497

1988

AL

.547

.511

.557

.530

.536

1988

NL

.453

.518

.557

.453

.495

1989

AL

.598

.507

.557

.501

.541

1989

NL

.402

.521

.557

.484

.491

1990

AL

.553

.504

.557

.525

.535

1990

NL

.447

.523

.557

.487

.504

1991

AL

.583

.497

.557

.515

.538

1991

NL

.417

.524

.557

.529

.507

1992

AL

.586

.504

.557

.519

.542

1992

NL

.414

.524

.557

.540

.509

1993

AL

.581

.511

.557

.490

.535

1993

NL

.419

.531

.557

.485

.498

1994

AL

.542

.514

.557

.412

.506

1994

NL

.458

.530

.557

.423

.492

1995

AL

.529

.511

.557

.500

.524

1995

NL

.471

.533

.557

.437

.500

1996

AL

.572

.514

.557

.522

.541

1996

NL

.428

.519

.557

.503

.502

1997

AL

.597

.510

.557

.530

.549

1997

NL

.403

.515

.557

.472

.487

1998

AL

.650

.503

.557

.526

.559

1998

NL

.350

.514

.557

.490

.478

1999

AL

.669

.503

.557

.500

.557

1999

NL

.331

.514

.557

.518

.480