The Walkers

May 31, 2019
 

The Walkers

 

 

 

Who's the greatest walker who ever lived, the greatest at extracting a walk from a pitcher? Optimally one would want to adjust that list for batter quality -- Barry Bonds is not the person I am asking about here, I don't think, pitchers were afraid to let him hit anything. Who's the greatest active walker?

Asked by: wovenstrap


Answered: 5/30/2019

 Interesting question.   I might do a study related to that; threat-adjusted walk percentage, or something.   I don't think there is anybody now who sort of specializes in that, the way some players did in the past (Max Bishop, Ed Yost, Eddie Stanky, Gene Tenace), perhaps because the game has changed.  I might study it.  

 

 

       The great Jim Murray once wrote about Maury Wills that there was one category Wills would never lead the league in:  Walks.   Murray was reflecting the normal assumption of the time, which was that a walk was an act of the pitcher.  Pitchers, he was implicitly saying, have an element of choice in who they walk.  They would never choose to walk Maury Wills, because of he was a threat on the base paths.    

       Wovenstrap’s question, when you think about it, still relies on that frame of reference.   When you ask "who is best at extracting a walk from a pitcher?", you are still implicitly stating that the act belongs to the pitcher, although advancing the argument by crediting the batter with an ability rather like the ability of a farmer to extract a loan from a banker or the ability of the cop to extract a confession from a criminal. 

       So my data group here is all player/seasons (non-pitcher) from 1913 to 2017, using 1913 as the back border because I wanted to study the influence of strikeouts on walks, assuming that some hitters who work the pitcher for a walk are also working him for a strikeout, like Mickey Mantle, let’s say.   Strikeout records are incomplete before 1913.  I used 2017 as the other border because I was using a version of the data base that I haven’t completely updated for 2018.  

       I tried to create a formula which estimates the "expected walks" for any hitter, based on

1) His power,

2) His batting average,

3) His strikeouts,

4) His speed, referencing the Jim Murray/Maury Wills example; pitchers might avoid walking hitters who are fast, and

5) Anything else that pops up as a separator between high-walk and low-walk players. 

 

Power

       Walks for a hitter definitely increase as power increases, although this effect is not as large as I would have guessed that it was.   There are many singles hitter in history who drew large numbers of walks; there are many power hitters who didn’t.  

 

Batting Average

       Batting average did not turn out to be useful as a predictor of walks drawn for a hitter, except for hitters who hit for a very high average, over .340.   If a player hits for a very high average, there is some "risk avoidance" of the hitter in run situations.  Otherwise, walks relate to batting average in a U-shaped curve.   The center of the batting average chart for all players in the study was .267.   Players with batting averages near .267 had lower walk rates than either players with very high batting averages or players with very low batting averages.   However, when I tried to build "absolute distance from batting average of .267" into the walks prediction formula, I could not improve the accuracy of the predictions by the use of that information, other than making an adjustment to expected walks for players who hit over .340.  

 

Strikeouts

       Strikeouts, at least in this study, did not seem to be a meaningful predictor of walks drawn, independent of home runs.   Of course strikeouts are fellow-travelers of home runs, and home runs predict walks, so there is an indirect effect of strikeouts on walks through the home run column.  But when you adjust for that, strikeouts do not seem to be useful information for predicting walks, at least that I could find in my four or five hours of messing around with the data. 

 

Speed

       Speed, again, is not a useful predictor of walks, I don’t believe.  "Fast" players actually walk MORE than "Slow" players, which makes sense when you understand that the batter is actually more in control of when a walk occurs than the pitcher is.  

       We know that the batter is more in control of when a walk occurs than the pitcher is because the standard deviation of walks per plate appearance is higher for batters than it is for pitchers.   In order the model the actual outcomes, you have to leave more space for the batter to control the event than you for the pitcher to control the event.   Understanding that, then, one would predict that fast players should walk more than slow players do, actually for the reason stated by Jim Murray.   As a pitcher would want to avoid walking a very fast runner, so also a fast runner would have more incentive to draw a walk than a slow runner would.   If the batter is more in control of the walk outcome than the pitcher is, one would expect walks to increase as speed increases, as they do.   But to make this information useful in a prediction model, you’d have to put more time into it than I have available. 

 

Anything else

       There is, actually, something else that pops out of the data that pretty important:  handedness.   Left-handed batters, controlling for power, walk quite significantly more often than right-handed hitters do.   Switch hitters walk even a little bit more often than left-handers.    We’ll have to adjust for that.

       Now that I think about it, I have "height" in the data base; I should have studied that.   It’s probably useful.   Oh, well.   I’m moving on; I’m publishing this today.   If you want to study it with height included as a factor, you go ahead. 

 

 

Before I make the Predictive Formula

       The first thing that I have to explain is that, by "home run percentage", I don’t EXACTLY mean the home run percentage, and, by batting average, I don’t EXACTLY mean the batting average.   I modified the player’s expected walks by his home run rate, and by his batting average if his batting average was over .340, but I didn’t use raw home run rate or raw batting average.   For home run rate, I used this:

 

        Home Runs + 1

--------------------------

            At Bats +42

 

       And for "batting average"  I used this:

 

              Hits + 16

-----------------------------

             At Bats + 60

 

       It’s what I call ballast.   I do that so that I don’t get crazy results for players who hit 2 home runs in 5 at bats.   Going 9-for-25 with 3 homers doesn’t make you a .360 hitter with home run rate of 72 per 600 at bats; it makes you a .294 hitter with a home run rate of 36 per 600 at bats, which is still pretty good, but normal. 

 

The Predictive Formula

       A player’s expected walks are:

1)   His home run rate,

2)   Times .7,

3)   Plus .069,

4)   Times his plate appearances,

5)   Times 1.1 if the player is a switch hitter, 1.08 if he is a left-handed hitter, and 0.92 if he is a right-handed hitter, and

6)  Increased by 12% if he hit over .340. 

 

       Let’s do a couple of players for whom the formula works, to show how it works.   Duke Snider in 1954 hit 40 home runs in 584 at bats, which we change to 41 in 626, figuring that he had a home run rate of .0655.  

       That number we multiply by .7, making .0458.  

       To that we add .069, making .1148. 

       We multiply his plate appearances (679) times .1148, making 77.98.  

       This we increase by 8% because Snider was a left-handed hitter, making an expectation of 84.2 walks.

       Snider in 1954 hit .341, HOWEVER, because of the "ballast" adjustment, we don’t treat him as a .341 hitter, but as a .334 hitter.  Therefore, we don’t make an additional adjustment for his high batting average, and his expected walks stay at 84.2.

       He did in fact walk 84 times.   The formula accurately predicts his walks, in that particular case. 

 

       George Springer in 2017 hit 34 homers in 548 at bats, which we interpret as a home run percentage of .0593 (35/590).  Multiply that by .7, you have .0415.   Add .069, you have .1105.

Multiply that by his plate appearances, 629, and you have 69.52 walks.    He is, however, a right-handed hitter, so we reduce that by 8%, and his expected walks are 63.96.  He actually drew 64 walks. 

       Chris Davis in 2017 hit 26 homers in 456 at bats, which we interpret to be a home run rate of .0542 (27/498).  Multiply that by .7, you have .0380.   Add .069, you have .107.  Multiply that by his plate appearances, 524, and you have 56.04.   He’s a left-handed hitter, so we’ll increase that by 8%; that makes 60.53.   He actually drew 61 walks.

       Hanley Ramirez exactly hit his expected walks drawn both in 2016 and 2017.   

       Let’s do somebody who has no power.   Luis Polonia in 1991 hit 2 homers in 604 at bats, which we interpret as a home run rate of .00464, or 3/646.   Multiply that by .7, you have .00325.  Add .069, you have .07225.   Multiply that by his plate appearances, 662, and you have 47.83 walks.   He’s a left-handed hitter, so we increase that by 8%, he winds up with 51.66 expected walks.  He actually drew 52 walks, so the formula works. 

       Later on, we’ll do the cases where it doesn’t work.  There are lots of cases where it works perfectly, literally hundreds of them, thousands of them if you included the low-at-bat guys, and many cases where it doesn’t work.  But when it doesn’t work, it is equally likely to be 50 walks too high, or 50 walks too low. 

 

The Results

       First of all, you have to just throw Barry Bonds in 2004 out the window; Barry Bonds in 2004 is just stupid data.   Note what I am saying; I am not saying that you have to throw Barry Bonds’ data out the window; I am just saying Barry Bonds in 2004.  We all know why this is; we don’t need to talk about it or explain it.   We’re just going to throw it away and move on.

       Throwing away Barry Bonds in 2004, the 25 most exceptional walk seasons of all time—that is, the 25 seasons in which the player most exceeded his expected walks—are these 25 seasons:

Rank

First

Last

YEAR

Expected

Actual

1

Eddie

Stanky

1945

48

148

2

Eddie

Yost

1956

53

151

3

Eddie

Stanky

1946

42

137

4

Eddie

Stanky

1950

51

144

5

Barry

Bonds

2002

106

198

6

Eddie

Joost

1949

62

149

7

Eddie

Yost

1950

56

141

8

Ferris

Fain

1949

54

136

9

Ted

Williams

1947

82

162

10

Jimmy

Wynn

1969

68

148

11

Rickey

Henderson

1996

46

125

12

Luke

Appling

1935

43

122

13

Max

Bishop

1929

50

128

14

Eddie

Yost

1954

53

131

15

Luke

Appling

1949

44

121

16

Jimmy

Wynn

1976

51

127

17

Max

Bishop

1926

40

116

18

Gene

Tenace

1977

49

125

19

Eddie

Yost

1959

60

135

20

Ferris

Fain

1950

59

133

21

Eddie

Stanky

1951

53

127

22

Max

Bishop

1930

54

128

23

Jack

Clark

1989

58

132

24

Rickey

Henderson

1989

52

126

25

Eddie

Yost

1960

52

125

 

       Eddie Stanky and Eddie Yost are, by this chart, the greatest non-threat Walkers of all time.   Wovenstrap said that "Barry Bonds" is not the answer he is looking for, and I agree that it isn’t, but Bonds in 2004 would have been +123 walks, if we were counting that. 

       Running the data for Stanky in 1945, The Brat hit 1 home run in 555 at bats, which we interpret as a home run rate of .00335.  Multiply that by .7, you’ve got .00234.  Add .069, you’ve got .07134.  Multiply that by his plate appearances (726), you’ve got an expectation of 51.8 walks, but he’s a right-handed hitter, so we reduce that by 8%, and he’s down to 47.7, which we will call 48.  He actually drew 148 walks, which I think was a National League record at the time, so he beat expectations by 100.   He is the only player in history, other than Bonds in 2004, to beat his expected walk total by 100. 

       Ed Yost in 1956. . .Ed Yost was known as the Walking Man.  Yost hit 11 homers in 515 at bats, which we interpret as a Home Run Percentage of .02154.   Multiply that by .7, that’s .0151; add .069 and it is .0841.   Yost had 684 plate appearances, so that’s an expectation of 57.5 walks, but he was a right-handed hitter, so we multiply that by .92, and we’re down to 52.9, or 53 walks.  He actually drew 151 walks, so that’s +98. 

       These are the greatest NON-Walking seasons in the data, by this method:

Rank

First

Last

YEAR

Expected

Actual

1

Garret

Anderson

2000

78

24

2

Rougned

Odor

2016

72

19

3

Alfonso

Soriano

2002

73

23

4

Bill

Terry

1932

81

32

5

Garret

Anderson

2001

74

27

6

Woody

Jensen

1936

63

16

7

Hal

Trosky

1936

83

36

8

Lou

Brock

1967

70

24

9

Joe

Pepitone

1964

70

24

10

Al

Oliver

1973

67

22

11

Cecil

Cooper

1982

77

32

12

Tony

Oliva

1964

79

34

13

Kirby

Puckett

1988

67

23

14

Joe

Pepitone

1963

67

23

15

Adam

Jones

2014

63

19

16

Garret

Anderson

2002

73

30

17

Dante

Bichette

1995

65

22

18

Willie

Davis

1966

58

15

19

Garry

Templeton

1979

60

18

20

Chuck

Klein

1930

96

54

21

Andre

Dawson

1987

74

32

22

Dave

Robertson

1916

56

14

23

A.J.

Pierzynski

2013

53

11

24

Garret

Anderson

2003

73

31

25

Bobby

Tolan

1969

68

27

26

Felipe

Alou

1966

65

24

 

       So the greatest NON-Walker of all time is, let us say, Garrett Anderson in 2000.  I’ll run the data for Garrett Anderson.  Anderson hit 35 homers in 647 at bats, which we interpret as a Home Run Percentage of .0522.  Multiply that by .7, that’s .0366.   Add .069, that’s .1056.  Multiply that by his plate appearances, 681, and he’s expected to walk 71.896 times.  He’s a left-handed hitter, so we increase that by 8%, and we’re up to 78 expected walks.  He actually walked only 24 times, so he is 54 walks short of expectation—the largest shortfall of all time.

       People think that Barry Bonds and Babe Ruth and Ted Williams walked a tremendous amount because they were left-handed hitters and great hitters with high averages and a lot of power, so naturally they’re going to walk a lot.  It’s not that simple.   Garrett Anderson in 2000 was a left-handed hitter; he hit .286 with 35 homers, which is pretty good, similar to what Barry Bonds did in 1995 (.294 with 33 homers).  But when Bonds did that, he drew 120 walks; when Anderson did it, he drew 24.  Bill Terry in 1932 was a left-handed hitter who hit for a good average (.350) with 28 homers—but he didn’t draw walks.  Hal Trosky in 1936 was a left-handed hitter who hit .343 with 42 homers—but he didn’t draw walks.  Cecil Cooper in 1932 was a left-handed hitter who hit .313 with 32 homers—but he didn’t draw walks.   Tony Oliva in 1964 was a left-handed hitter who hit .323 with 32 homers—but he didn’t draw walks.  Chuck Klein in 1930 was a left-handed hitter who hit .386 with 40 homers, but he didn’t draw a lot of walks.  Bonds, Ruth and Ted Williams didn’t draw huge numbers of walks because they were left-handed hitters who hit .350 with power; they took a large number of walks because that was part of their approach.  It was an additional skill that they had. 

 

Career Numbers

       Well, before I get there, there is a point I should have made earlier.  

 

The Point I Should have Made Earlier

       Hitters walk, over time, in about 8.8% of plate appearances.  The first-effort approach to predicting walks for each hitter, then, is just to predict that every hitter will walk in about 8.8% of his plate appearances.  

       You can improve that estimate by (1) adjusting for his power, and (2) adjusting for whether he is a left-handed hitter or a normal person, but these improvements don’t actually do a hell of a lot.   You have a certain amount of error in the first effort, and then, by making these adjustments, you can remove about 20% of that error, get the estimates 20% closer to what actually happens.

       And then that’s about all you can do, just remove about 20% of the error.   I’m sure you could do better than I could, if you spent a week with the data rather than a few hours, but I’m also pretty confident that you couldn’t remove 40 or 50% of the error; maybe you could get to 25% or something, but not much better.  

       The reason that is true is that drawing walks is a strong individual skill or trait.   How many walks you draw—and here again, we have to say "with the exception of Barry Bonds in 2004."  But with the exception of Barry Bonds in 2004, how many walks you draw is NOT primarily a function of how much power you have or what your batting average is or whether you are fast or slow or fat or ugly or whether you hit right-handed or left-handed.   It is a primarily a function of the batter’s ability to draw a walk.   Because it is an independent skill of its own, it cannot be indirectly measured or independently predicted with great accuracy based on the player’s other characteristics.  

 

Career Numbers

       These are the greatest walk-drawers of all time, career totals, in terms of drawing more walks than you would expect them to draw:

 

First

Last

Expected

Actual

Margin

Rickey

Henderson

1078

2190

1112

Eddie

Yost

699

1614

915

Barry

Bonds

1672

2558

886

Joe

Morgan

1091

1865

774

Ted

Williams

1247

2021

774

Max

Bishop

477

1153

676

Eddie

Stanky

374

996

622

Frank

Thomas

1046

1667

621

Luke

Appling

704

1302

598

Willie

Randolph

651

1243

592

Babe

Ruth

1530

2062

532

Harmon

Killebrew

1047

1559

512

Pee Wee

Reese

701

1210

509

Eddie

Joost

538

1043

505

Lu

Blue

596

1092

496

Jimmy

Wynn

728

1224

496

Harlond

Clift

574

1070

496

Edgar

Martinez

791

1283

492

Ferris

Fain

414

904

490

Jack

Clark

776

1262

486

Mickey

Mantle

1253

1733

480

Gene

Tenace

506

984

478

Tony

Phillips

842

1319

477

Eddie

Collins

740

1213

473

Bobby

Abreu

1007

1476

469

 

       26th is Wade Boggs.   And these are the greatest walk-drawers in terms of the ratio of expected to actual walks drawn, minimum total of 1000 between expected and actual:

First

Last

Expected

Actual

Ratio

Eddie

Stanky

374

996

2.660

Max

Bishop

477

1153

2.418

Eddie

Yost

699

1614

2.309

Ferris

Fain

414

904

2.182

Rickey

Henderson

1078

2190

2.031

Gene

Tenace

506

984

1.946

Rick

Ferrell

480

931

1.939

Eddie

Joost

538

1043

1.938

Willie

Randolph

651

1243

1.909

Lyn

Lary

378

705

1.864

Harlond

Clift

574

1070

1.863

Luke

Appling

704

1302

1.849

Lu

Blue

596

1092

1.833

Roy

Cullenbine

467

852

1.823

Elmer

Valo

518

943

1.822

Willie

Kamm

469

824

1.756

Dave

Magadan

414

718

1.733

Pee Wee

Reese

701

1210

1.726

Joe

Morgan

1091

1865

1.710

Jimmy

Wynn

728

1224

1.681

Earl

Torgeson

584

980

1.679

Mike

Hargrove

576

965

1.675

Elbie

Fletcher

510

851

1.670

Bill

North

376

627

1.669

Eddie

Collins

740

1213

1.640

 

       These are the top 25 NON-Walkers of all time:

 

First

Last

Expected

Actual

Ratio

A.J.

Pierzynski

735

308

.419

Garret

Anderson

910

429

.471

Willie

Davis

882

418

.474

Bill

Buckner

892

450

.504

Garry

Templeton

688

375

.545

Cecil

Cooper

794

448

.564

Carl

Crawford

648

377

.582

Vada

Pinson

983

574

.584

Al

Oliver

908

535

.589

George

Sisler

794

472

.594

Ivan

Rodriguez

862

513

.595

Andre

Dawson

979

589

.602

Steve

Garvey

786

479

.609

Alfonso

Soriano

809

496

.613

Juan

Gonzalez

744

457

.614

Vinny

Castilla

685

423

.617

Joe

Carter

849

527

.621

Lloyd

Waner

669

420

.627

Robinson

Cano

875

550

.628

Willie

Wilson

676

425

.629

Frank

White

651

412

.633

Brandon

Phillips

651

416

.639

Willie

McGee

701

448

.639

Matt

Williams

733

469

.640

Lee

May

760

487

.641

 

 

Here is a full listing of all players whose walks + expected walks total 1,000 or more.   Data for active players is a year out of date, because I haven’t updated something for 2018 yet:

First

Last

Expected

Actual

Margin

Ratio

Hank

Aaron

1420

1402

-18

.988

Bobby

Abreu

1007

1476

469

1.466

Joe

Adcock

691

594

-97

.859

Edgardo

Alfonzo

495

596

101

1.203

Dick

Allen

713

894

181

1.253

Bob

Allison

562

795

233

1.415

Roberto

Alomar

976

1032

56

1.057

Felipe

Alou

643

423

-220

.657

Moises

Alou

741

737

-4

.995

Brady

Anderson

764

960

196

1.257

Garret

Anderson

910

429

-481

.471

Luis

Aparicio

779

736

-43

.944

Luke

Appling

704

1302

598

1.849

Richie

Ashburn

768

1198

430

1.559

Brad

Ausmus

514

634

120

1.233

Earl

Averill

747

775

28

1.037

Jeff

Bagwell

942

1401

459

1.487

Bob

Bailey

586

852

266

1.454

Harold

Baines

1142

1062

-80

.930

Dusty

Baker

682

762

80

1.117

Dave

Bancroft

664

827

163

1.245

Sal

Bando

707

1031

324

1.459

Ernie

Banks

1010

763

-247

.756

Jesse

Barfield

511

551

40

1.079

Dick

Bartell

619

748

129

1.208

Hank

Bauer

483

521

38

1.079

Jose

Bautista

680

965

285

1.419

Jason

Bay

494

636

142

1.288

Don

Baylor

839

805

-34

.959

Mark

Belanger

443

576

133

1.301

Buddy

Bell

781

836

55

1.071

Gus

Bell

695

470

-225

.676

Jay

Bell

686

853

167

1.244

Albert

Belle

699

683

-16

.978

Carlos

Beltran

1205

1084

-121

.899

Adrian

Beltre

1055

814

-241

.772

Johnny

Bench

823

891

68

1.082

Lance

Berkman

917

1201

284

1.309

Yogi

Berra

910

704

-206

.774

Craig

Biggio

1008

1160

152

1.151

Max

Bishop

477

1153

676

2.418

Don

Blasingame

468

552

84

1.180

Lu

Blue

596

1092

496

1.833

Ossie

Bluege

514

724

210

1.410

Bruce

Bochte

535

653

118

1.220

Wade

Boggs

949

1412

463

1.488

Barry

Bonds

1672

2558

886

1.530

Bobby

Bonds

751

914

163

1.217

Bobby

Bonilla

871

912

41

1.047

Bob

Boone

598

663

65

1.108

Bret

Boone

648

552

-96

.852

Ray

Boone

446

608

162

1.362

Jim

Bottomley

821

664

-157

.809

Lou

Boudreau

509

796

287

1.565

Larry

Bowa

715

474

-241

.663

Ken

Boyer

722

713

-9

.988

Ryan

Braun

603

511

-92

.847

George

Brett

1141

1096

-45

.961

John

Briggs

481

663

182

1.379

Lou

Brock

965

761

-204

.788

Jay

Bruce

657

528

-129

.804

Tom

Brunansky

646

770

124

1.191

Bill

Bruton

579

482

-97

.833

Bill

Buckner

892

450

-442

.504

Don

Buford

492

672

180

1.365

Jay

Buhner

599

792

193

1.322

Ellis

Burks

764

793

29

1.038

Jeromy

Burnitz

752

739

-13

.982

George J.

Burns

556

863

307

1.554

Pat

Burrell

628

932

304

1.485

Jeff

Burroughs

583

831

248

1.425

Donie

Bush

470

770

300

1.640

Brett

Butler

769

1129

360

1.468

Melky

Cabrera

632

473

-159

.748

Miguel

Cabrera

941

1065

124

1.131

Orlando

Cabrera

614

514

-100

.838

Johnny

Callison

741

650

-91

.877

Mike

Cameron

700

867

167

1.238

Dolph

Camilli

681

947

266

1.390

Ken

Caminiti

745

727

-18

.975

Roy

Campanella

475

533

58

1.122

Bert

Campaneris

675

618

-57

.916

Bruce

Campbell

492

548

56

1.113

Robinson

Cano

875

550

-325

.628

Jose

Canseco

840

906

66

1.078

Jose

Cardenal

589

608

19

1.032

Leo

Cardenas

557

522

-35

.936

Rod

Carew

904

1018

114

1.127

Max

Carey

789

933

144

1.182

Gary

Carter

802

848

46

1.058

Joe

Carter

849

527

-322

.621

Rico

Carty

551

642

91

1.164

Sean

Casey

531

477

-54

.899

Norm

Cash

920

1043

123

1.133

Vinny

Castilla

685

423

-262

.617

Luis

Castillo

602

800

198

1.330

Phil

Cavarretta

667

820

153

1.229

Cesar

Cedeno

658

664

6

1.009

Orlando

Cepeda

810

588

-222

.726

Ron

Cey

758

1012

254

1.335

Chris

Chambliss

773

632

-141

.818

Ben

Chapman

541

824

283

1.522

Sam

Chapman

482

561

79

1.163

Eric

Chavez

678

639

-39

.942

Shin-Soo

Choo

571

685

114

1.199

Jeff

Cirillo

473

563

90

1.190

Jack

Clark

776

1262

486

1.627

Tony

Clark

593

527

-66

.889

Will

Clark

857

937

80

1.093

Royce

Clayton

601

565

-36

.940

Roberto

Clemente

833

621

-212

.745

Harlond

Clift

574

1070

496

1.863

Ty

Cobb

785

963

178

1.227

Mickey

Cochrane

577

857

280

1.485

Rocky

Colavito

748

951

203

1.271

Eddie

Collins

740

1213

473

1.640

Earle

Combs

547

670

123

1.224

Dave

Concepcion

691

736

45

1.066

Jeff

Conine

646

671

25

1.038

Cecil

Cooper

794

448

-346

.564

Craig

Counsell

452

589

137

1.303

Doc

Cramer

782

571

-211

.731

Carl

Crawford

648

377

-271

.582

Coco

Crisp

617

561

-56

.910

Joe

Cronin

690

1059

369

1.534

Frankie

Crosetti

539

792

253

1.470

Jose

Cruz

808

898

90

1.111

Jose Jr.

Cruz

587

658

71

1.120

Nelson

Cruz

590

496

-94

.840

Tony

Cuccinello

508

579

71

1.140

Michael

Cuddyer

524

527

3

1.005

Roy

Cullenbine

467

852

385

1.823

Kiki

Cuyler

635

676

41

1.064

Johnny

Damon

1013

1003

-10

.990

Al

Dark

588

430

-158

.732

Jake

Daubert

556

477

-79

.858

Darren

Daulton

443

629

186

1.421

Alvin

Davis

513

685

172

1.335

Chili

Davis

1061

1194

133

1.126

Chris

Davis

569

472

-97

.829

Eric

Davis

589

740

151

1.256

Willie

Davis

882

418

-464

.474

Andre

Dawson

979

589

-390

.602

Doug

DeCinces

581

618

37

1.064

Rob

Deer

448

575

127

1.284

David

DeJesus

528

510

-18

.967

Carlos

Delgado

1051

1109

58

1.056

Rick

Dempsey

417

592

175

1.419

Delino

DeShields

570

754

184

1.324

Bill

Dickey

702

678

-24

.966

Dom

DiMaggio

478

750

272

1.569

Joe

DiMaggio

759

790

31

1.041

Larry

Doby

687

871

184

1.267

Bobby

Doerr

670

809

139

1.208

Bill

Doran

528

709

181

1.343

Brian

Downing

796

1197

401

1.504

J.D.

Drew

665

862

197

1.296

Dan

Driessen

606

761

155

1.257

Adam

Dunn

1022

1317

295

1.289

Ray

Durham

806

820

14

1.017

Jermaine

Dye

682

597

-85

.875

Jimmy

Dykes

680

958

278

1.409

Lenny

Dykstra

468

640

172

1.369

Damion

Easley

511

510

-1

.997

Jim

Edmonds

927

998

71

1.077

Bob

Elliott

647

967

320

1.495

Edwin

Encarnacion

684

766

82

1.120

Del

Ennis

702

597

-105

.850

Darin

Erstad

607

475

-132

.782

Andre

Ethier

539

519

-20

.963

Darrell

Evans

1161

1605

444

1.382

Dwight

Evans

953

1391

438

1.460

Carl

Everett

578

442

-136

.764

Ferris

Fain

414

904

490

2.182

Ron

Fairly

815

1052

237

1.290

Tony

Fernandez

754

690

-64

.915

Rick

Ferrell

480

931

451

1.939

Cecil

Fielder

601

693

92

1.153

Prince

Fielder

785

847

62

1.078

Steve

Finley

1032

844

-188

.818

Carlton

Fisk

887

849

-38

.957

Elbie

Fletcher

510

851

341

1.670

Cliff

Floyd

645

601

-44

.932

George

Foster

735

666

-69

.906

Jack

Fournier

578

583

5

1.008

Dexter

Fowler

457

617

160

1.350

Nellie

Fox

812

719

-93

.885

Jimmie

Foxx

1051

1452

401

1.382

Julio

Franco

745

917

172

1.230

Tito

Francona

543

544

1

1.002

Bill

Freehan

582

626

44

1.076

Jim

Fregosi

581

715

134

1.232

Lonny

Frey

537

752

215

1.401

Frankie

Frisch

872

728

-144

.835

Travis

Fryman

614

602

-12

.980

Rafael

Furcal

649

643

-6

.990

Carl

Furillo

580

514

-66

.886

Gary

Gaetti

870

634

-236

.729

Augie

Galan

626

979

353

1.563

Andres

Galarraga

844

583

-261

.691

Oscar

Gamble

557

610

53

1.095

Ron

Gant

690

770

80

1.116

Phil

Garner

517

564

47

1.092

Steve

Garvey

786

479

-307

.609

Lou

Gehrig

1226

1508

282

1.230

Charlie

Gehringer

950

1185

235

1.248

Jason

Giambi

1053

1366

313

1.297

Kirk

Gibson

708

718

10

1.014

Brian

Giles

837

1183

346

1.414

Jim

Gilliam

697

1036

339

1.486

Troy

Glaus

635

854

219

1.344

Adrian

Gonzalez

844

767

-77

.908

Juan

Gonzalez

744

457

-287

.614

Luis

Gonzalez

1087

1155

68

1.063

Billy

Goodman

511

669

158

1.309

Alex

Gordon

572

565

-7

.988

Joe

Gordon

595

759

164

1.276

Sid

Gordon

516

731

215

1.416

Goose

Goslin

957

949

-8

.991

Mark

Grace

845

1075

230

1.273

Curtis

Granderson

829

829

0

1.000

George

Grantham

535

717

182

1.340

Shawn

Green

865

744

-121

.861

Hank

Greenberg

627

852

225

1.359

Bobby

Grich

689

1087

398

1.577

Ken Jr.

Griffey

1366

1312

-54

.961

Ken Sr.

Griffey

729

719

-10

.987

Charlie

Grimm

726

578

-148

.796

Marquis

Grissom

725

553

-172

.762

Dick

Groat

554

490

-64

.885

Heine

Groh

470

688

218

1.463

John

Grubb

446

566

120

1.269

Pedro

Guerrero

541

609

68

1.127

Vladimir

Guerrero

885

737

-148

.833

Carlos