You'll Ryu the Day

October 12, 2019
This isn’t exactly the article that I initially planned to write. I was originally going to write about Jacob deGrom and the prospects of him taking home his 2nd consecutive Cy Young Award despite having a very modest W-L record both seasons…..10-8 in 2018, 11-8 in 2019. My impression, which I’ll circle back to later, is that if you asked a Magic 8-Ball if he were going to win, you’d probably get a reply of "Outlook good" or "Signs point to yes". I don’t think he’s a lock…..but I do think he’s going to win (more on that later).
 
However, I wasn’t happy with how the article was unfolding, so I scrapped it and refocused the topic more towards the subject of one of the other top contenders for the 2019 NL Cy Young Award, Hyun-Jin Ryu of the Dodgers.
 
As you may be aware, Ryu had a helluva a season in 2019, and he was especially impressive for the first half of the year. These are his game-by-game earned runs allowed totals for his first 15 starts:
 
1,2,2,2,2,1,0,0,0,2,0,0,1,0,1
 
Through June 27, Ryu stood with a 9-1 record and a microscopic 1.27 ERA.   Then, he had an unfortunate incident, one that has been known to cause pitchers great pain over the years.
 
He started a game at Coors Field.
 
Ryu only lasted 4 innings, giving up 7 earned runs. His ERA ballooned by more than half a run, although it was a still-impressive 1.83. 
 
Undeterred, he recovered from that setback, and over the next 6 starts he yielded, in order, 0,0,1,1,0,0 (with one of those "zeros" being a rematch at Coors Field in which Ryu pitched much better). That brought his record to 12-2 on the year through a total of 22 starts, with his ERA back down to 1.45. The date on the calendar at that time was August 11th, roughly three-fourths of the season in the rear view mirror.
 
Ryu’s season was not without its challenges, as he spent 2 different stints on the injured list, missing time in mid-April with a groin strain, then some additional time in early August with neck soreness. But, if you could eliminate that one bad outing at Coors, Ryu would have stood at 12-1 with an incredible 1.04 ERA. 
 
You all probably know what happened from that point on. Over his final 7 starts on the season, Ryu gave up 7 runs twice, 4 runs once, and 3 runs twice. He did have 2 more 0-run outings, but his final ERA for the season ended up at 2.32, which was still good enough to lead the league, but it left one with a sense of what might have been.
 
Ryu’s success, with an ERA in the low 1’s for the majority of the year, put me in sentimental mood, reminding me of that amazing and historic Bob Gibson season of 1968 when he posted his stunning 1.12 ERA, which still looks like a typo after all these years.
 
Gibson 1968, in Review
 
One of the true pleasures of being a baseball fan today, especially if you like researching a topic, is the ability to easily take a deep dive into virtually anything you want to look at by leveraging sites such as baseball-reference.com. I had never dug in deep to Gibson’s historic 1968 season before, but seeing Ryu’s performance put me in a mind to do so. 
 
Now, there are some caveats in making these comparisons, because they were very different pitchers in very different times. Gibson completed 28 of his 34 starts (younger baseball fans might ask at this point, "what is this complete game metric of which you speak?"). Ryu completed 1 of his 29 starts. Gibson logged over 300 innings, while Ryu managed just over 180. Definitely different times as far as starting pitcher expectations.
 
They both struck out about 8 batters per 9 innings, but even those aren’t really comparable because of the stark difference in how often batters were striking out in each context. Gibson led the league in total strikeouts in 1968, and achieved his rate of 7.9 K/9 in a league where the number of strikeouts per team per game was only 5.8. On the other hand, while Ryu’s K/9 rate was about the same (8.0), the overall 2019 NL rate was up to 8.9. So, Gibson was basically striking out batters at a rate about 35% above the norm, where as Ryu was about 10% below.
 
Also, while Gibson did display his best season ever in terms of limiting walks (1.8 per 9 innings, much better than his 3.1 career rate), Ryu only gave up 1.2, which led the NL in 2019 by a healthy margin.
 
So, while I am making comparisons between the seasons the 2 pitchers were having, it’s mostly due to the "bottom line" of their low ERA’s. They were very different pitchers in very different eras…..and we haven’t even really talked about the differences in terms of run context between the 2 seasons.
 
It’s hard to believe Gibson’s landmark season was more than 50 years ago now. I just missed experiencing that season as it occurred, as my first true season of following baseball was 1970, although I have faint memories of 1969.
 
You probably know some fundamental facts about Gibson’s 1968 season, and I suspect most of you know that 1968 was famously the "Year of the Pitcher", as runs scored were at near-record lows:
 
  • MLB teams averaged only 3.42 runs per game, just barely missing the all-time low of 3.38 in 1908.  
 
  • Batting averages were at an all-time low at .237. 
 
  • 1968 also saw the last occurrence of a 30-game winner (Denny McLain, who became the first one since Dizzy Dean in 1934 to reach that level), Don Drysdale set a mark (since broken) for 58 2/3 consecutive scoreless innings, and Luis Tiant posted a 1.60 ERA.
 
You probably have also heard the observation that many have wondered how in the hell Gibson, with his 1.12 ERA, managed to lose 9 games. It doesn’t seem to fit. You probably also know that he threw 13 shutouts and struck on 17 Tigers in game 1 of the World Series.
 
In any case, here are some other significant data points that I found interesting when diving into Gibson’s 1968 season.
 
  • Gibson not only won both the NL Cy Young Award and the NL MVP (which is rare enough, having only been done only 10 times), he also won the Gold Glove, making him the only pitcher to do all 3 in the same year.

  • Gibson completed 28 of his 34 starts (ah, remember those days?). Gibson averaged 9.0 innings per start (he had several games where he pitched into extra innings).

  • Gibson was 5-0 when supported with 6 runs or more and 8-1 when supported with 3-5 runs. Almost all of his losses occurred whey supported with 2 runs or less (he had a 9-8 ledger in those games), although he posted a rather impressive 0.97 ERA in those circumstances.

    Overall, Gibson only received an average run support of 3.0 runs per game, by far the lowest of his career. Yes, it was 1968, but even in the context of that year, it was pretty meager support, and was certainly part of the reason why he was ultimately tagged with 9 losses.

  • In his 22 victories, Gibson had a 0.57 ERA. In his 9 losses, he had a 2.14 ERA.

  • He was dominant basically all year long, but he really got on a roll in the months of June & July, when he went a combined 12-0 with an 0.50 ERA, hurling 8 shutouts in 12 starts, including 5 in a row. 

    May was a hard-luck month for him, going 2-4 despite a 1.27 ERA. Those 4 losses occurred in his last 4 starts of the month. He lost by scores of 3-2, 1-0, 2-0, and 3-1. At the end of May, his season-to-date record stood at 3-5 despite a 1.52 ERA.
 
Here’s his full monthly breakout:

Split
W
L
ERA
G
GS
CG
SHO
IP
H
ER
HR
BB
SO
SO9
April/March
1
1
1.97
4
4
2
0
32.0
25
7
2
6
18
5.1
May
2
4
1.27
6
6
4
0
56.2
33
8
2
15
44
7.0
June
6
0
0.50
6
6
6
5
54.0
28
3
1
8
43
7.2
July
6
0
0.50
6
6
6
3
54.0
35
3
0
8
48
8.0
August
4
1
1.29
6
6
5
3
56.0
36
8
3
13
62
10.0
Sept/Oct
3
3
1.56
6
6
5
2
52.0
41
9
3
12
53
9.2
 
  • At the end of July, his season record stood at 15-5 with a 0.96 ERA, which, except for immediately after his first start (when he pitched 7 scoreless innings), was his lowest ERA at any point in the season.

  • Only one team hung Gibson with an ERA of 2.00 or higher (the Dodgers at 2.12).  

  • The Giants were the only team against whom Gibson had a losing record (1-3, despite a 1.64 ERA).

  • Gibson was especially deadly at night, going 17-5 with a 0.93 ERA.

  • Gibson never surrendered more than 4 earned runs in a game (he did that twice).

Gibson has one other very interesting split in his record:
 
Split
W
L
ERA
G
GS
CG
SHO
IP
H
R
ER
BB
SO
SO9
BB9
SO/W
H9
Home
10
6
1.41
18
18
13
6
160.0
111
34
25
18
147
8.3
1.0
8.2
6.2
Away
12
3
0.81
16
16
15
7
144.2
87
15
13
44
121
7.5
2.7
2.8
5.4
 
Gibson’s ERA was quite a bit better on the road even though his walk rate was nearly 3 times as high on the road vs. it was at home.   He did give up fewer hits per 9 on the road, but his K/BB ratio of 8.2 at home vs. just 2.8 on the road is a pretty striking contrast.
 
 
Back to 2019
 
So, what are Ryu’s chances of winning the Cy Young Award in 2019? Will his late season swoon likely prevent him from winning the award?
 
In all likelihood, yes.
 
There’s a nifty projection tool developed by Tom Tango a few years ago that attempts to project the winners of the Cy Young awards each year by calculating a point total based on 4 simple data markers (innings pitched, earned runs allowed, strikeouts, and wins). The more points you have, the more likely you are to win the award. 
 
As someone who does forecasting for a living, it has 2 very appealing features for me:
 
1)      It’s proven to be very accurate
2)      It’s very simple
 
The basic formula is Cy Young Points = ​(IP/2 - ER) + SO/10 + W (there’s another version he developed that would extend to relievers as well, but for the most part, the overwhelming majority of true Cy Young Award contenders at this point are starters). As Tango puts it, "it’s so simple you can do it in your head". It captures 4 key attributes that tend to be fundamental in voter evaluation of starting pitchers:
 
·         Workload (Innings)
·         Run prevention (Earned Runs)
·         Ability to make batters miss (Strikeouts)
·         Contributing to team victories (Wins)
 
No WAR, no ERA+. No FIP, no WHIP. No muss, no fuss. I don’t know, but I suspect that Tango kept it simple because, when you get right down to it, the formula predicts the results pretty reliably just by using those 4 data points all by themselves. At this point, I don’t know how much voters tend to consider those other metrics anyway. I’m sure some look at them, but maybe the 4 basic ones are all you need, so why complicate it?
 
The formula correctly predicted deGrom over Scherzer and Nola in the NL last year, as well as Snell over Verlander in the AL. It correctly predicted Scherzer and Kluber the year before, and Scherzer as well in 2016 (although it misfired on Porcello vs. Verlander, much to the dismay of Kate Upton). In 2015, it got Arrieta and Kuechel right. It has a really good track record, and does a nice job of predicting not only the winner, but also identifying the top contenders in the right order (or at least really close to it). It’s not perfect, of course…..but it has a really solid track record.
 
On the site BaseballMusings.com, there’s a cool little page that calculates the Tango Cy Young Award points for any season (it looks like it has a back end of 1957, which is around the time that the Award started). And not only that, it calculates it at through any day in the season, so you can see how different pitchers were tracking at any point in the season. It also displays "Bill James Cy Young points" using a formula introduced about 15 years ago in the "Neyer/James Guide to Pitchers", as well as Bill’s "Season Score", which (I believe) dates back to around 2007.
 
By way of example, here are the final 2018 results for the top pitchers (it always displays both leagues together). 
 
Sorted by Tango Cy Young points:
Pitcher
W
L
Innings
Earned Runs
Strikeouts
Tom Tango Cy Young Pts
Bill James Cy Young Pts
Season Score
Jacob deGrom
10
9
217
41
269
104.4
144.0
267.3
Max Scherzer
18
7
220 2/3
62
300
96.3
180.6
312.2
Blake Snell
21
5
180 2/3
38
221
95.4
196.8
325.8
Justin Verlander
16
9
214
60
290
92.0
174.1
283.5
Aaron Nola
17
6
212 1/3
56
224
89.6
170.6
296.9
Corey Kluber
20
7
215
69
222
80.7
187.9
292.7
Gerrit Cole
15
5
200 1/3
64
276
78.8
163.3
260.8
Trevor Bauer
12
6
175 1/3
43
221
78.8
147.3
231.6
Chris Sale
12
4
158
37
237
77.7
146.5
242.1
Kyle Freeland
17
7
202 1/3
64
173
71.5
150.8
251.6
 
One of the things I like about the formula is that, although it doesn’t weigh wins as heavily as other formulas ( which certainly reflects the trend in voter preferences), it doesn’t entirely dismiss them either.   It recognizes that wins still carry some weight with some of the voters, and can help sway some votes if pitchers are close in other regards. I think that’s reasonable – clearly wins don’t mean as much as they used to in winning the Cy Young Award, but they do still mean something. deGrom was able to win the award in 2018 despite a modest win total because his ERA was light years better than everyone else’s, but if it was closer, you can bet that his lack of wins would likely have become a bigger factor.
 
How can I say that? Well, in late August 2018, there was a poll taken among a portion of potential Cy Young voters, and it was basically a toss up between deGrom (who was 8-8, 1.68 at the time) and Max Scherzer (16-6, 2.22 at the time), essentially splitting the votes.   At that time, deGrom had a decent advantage in ERA, but Scherzer’s ERA was pretty sparkling as well, plus he doubled deGrom’s wins. Combine that with Scherzer’s impressive strikeout totals, and it was basically a coin flip. In addition, the Tango Tracker had it shaping up as a tight race as well – as of 8/31/18, they were separated by less than a point.
 
Here’s what the tracker looked like as of 8/31/18 for the top 3 NL contenders:
 
Pitcher
W
L
Innings
Earned Runs
Strikeouts
Tom Tango Cy Young Pts
Bill James Cy Young Pts
Season Score
Max Scherzer
16
6
186 2/3
46
249
88.2
163.5
280.8
Jacob deGrom
8
8
182
34
224
87.4
117.8
217.7
Aaron Nola
15
3
176
41
177
79.7
155.5
272.4
 
However, over the rest of the season, deGrom went 2-1 with a 1.80 ERA (meaning that he at least ended up with a winning record and reached doube-digit wins, both of which probably psychologically helped with some voters), while Scherzer went 2-1 with a 4.24 ERA, by far his worst ERA month of the year. His final ERA of 2.53 didn’t seem quite as glitzy as 2.22. I think there was just too much distance between their ERA’s at that point.
 
Here are the top 10 results for pitchers from both leagues for 2019 (sorted by Tango Cy Young Points):
 
Pitcher
W
L
Innings
Earned Runs
Strikeouts
Tom Tango Cy Young Pts
Bill James Cy Young Pts
Season Score
Gerrit Cole
20
5
212 1/3
59
326
99.8
208.1
336.3
Justin Verlander
21
6
223
64
300
98.5
211.9
343.9
Jacob deGrom
11
8
204
55
255
83.5
129.6
236.3
Hyun-Jin Ryu
14
5
182 2/3
47
163
74.6
155.1
247.7
Zack Greinke
18
5
208 2/3
68
187
73.0
173.5
275.5
Jack Flaherty
11
8
196 1/3
60
231
72.3
130.3
211.5
Charlie Morton
16
6
194 2/3
66
240
71.3
146.1
245.8
Stephen Strasburg
18
6
209
77
251
70.6
156.0
263.5
Shane Bieber
15
8
214 1/3
78
259
70.1
138.7
233.8
Patrick Corbin
14
7
202
73
238
65.8
130.1
214.2
 
So, the Tango Point System implies that Cole vs. Verlander is a toss up in the AL (which seems likely, as there’s very little separating the pitching records of those 2 teammates across the board), and that deGrom should prevail over Ryu, Flaherty, and Strasburg in the NL (Greinke split his time between the 2 leagues, and unless you have a Rick Sutcliffe 1984 type of season, you’re probably not going to win the award in either league in that situation).
 
What about if you go back to August 11th, when Ryu’s ERA was still at 1.45? Here were the results at that point:
 
Pitcher
W
L
Innings
Earned Runs
Strikeouts
Tom Tango Cy Young Pts
Bill James Cy Young Pts
Season Score
Hyun-Jin Ryu
12
2
142 2/3
23
121
72.4
147.3
236.7
Justin Verlander
15
4
162 2/3
51
217
67.0
151.5
240.0
Gerrit Cole
14
5
156 2/3
50
226
64.9
141.9
218.2
Max Scherzer
9
5
134 1/3
36
189
59.1
98.4
176.1
Charlie Morton
13
4
149
48
184
57.9
120.1
202.2
Luis Castillo
11
4
143 2/3
43
172
57.0
109.1
183.4
Jacob deGrom
7
7
148
44
189
55.9
82.0
148.3
Mike Minor
11
6
155
50
159
54.4
104.4
176.2
Shane Bieber
12
4
156 1/3
57
193
52.5
123.9
191.3
Zack Greinke
11
4
152
49
137
51.7
116.9
182.6
 
With a month and a half to go, Ryu was in the NL driver’s seat. No other NL pitcher was very close.   But, Ryu struggled down the stretch, while at the same time deGrom once again had a tremendous finishing kick (1.44 ERA in the 2nd half, 1.29 in September), and now he looks to be the favorite to repeat.   He’s not a lock….but everything I’ve read online seems to imply that he is the odds-on favorite.
 
Would I like to see Ryu win? I would. He has a shot…..Ryu has 3 more wins and 3 fewer losses than deGrom, but those don’t seem to count as much as they used to. He did lead the league in ERA (and ERA+) and displayed tremendous control, yielding only 1.2 BB/9 (which led the league by a substantial margin).    But deGrom once again had an outstanding season without much support, and he led the league in K’s (he also led in pitching WAR, although it’s not entirely clear whether voters place much value on that at this point). Strasburg led in wins and innings, but his ERA is about a run per game higher than deGrom and Ryu, and that will likely hurt him.
 
Scherzer, Kershaw, Flaherty, Corbin, Soroka, Gray….any of them could get some down ballot votes. When I scan articles for different writers’ takes on the NL Cy Young race, the name I see mentioned most often, after deGrom, is Scherzer. Scherzer did lead the league in FIP, K/9 and K/BB, and for voters that like WAR, he’s 2nd in fWAR and 4th in rWAR despite missing several starts, but I’m not sure how many voters really rely on WAR when it comes to the Cy Young award (for what it’s worth, deGrom led the NL in both fWAR and rWAR). 
 
And, for the 2nd straight season, Scherzer had his worst month of the year in September (5.16 ERA), which pushed his final ERA up to 2.92. I’m just not seeing the case for Scherzer, but maybe I’m missing something. I think it’s going to come down to deGrom, Ryu, and Strasburg as the top 3.
 
One last thought….if deGrom had his 2019 season in 2018 instead, he would not have won last year.  At best, I think he’d have been third in 2018 behind Scherzer and Nola. In my opinion, the 2019 list of top contenders in the NL is far weaker than it was in 2018, which is a big reason why deGrom, despite another modest win total, could take home his 2nd Cy Young in a row.
 
Thanks for reading,

 

Dan

 

 
 
 

COMMENTS (9 Comments, most recent shown first)

wovenstrap
I went and counted up all the unearned runs in Gibson's games in 1968, to see who was at fault. Here's the info:

4/10 vs. Atl: E7 (Brock); ND
4/20 vs. Chi: E4 (Javier); L
5/01 vs. Hou: E3 (Cepeda), E6 (Maxvill); W
5/12 vs. Hou: E6 (Maxvill); L
8/04 vs. StL: E5 (Shannon); ND
8/24 vs. Pit: E3 (Cepeda), E6 (Maxvill); L
9/06 vs. SFr: E6 (Maxvill); L
9/22 vs. LAD: E9 (Hague); L

5:48 PM Oct 14th
 
OldBackstop
I had hoped that deGrom's Cy Young last year would wipe "wins" out of the statistical collective memory 100 percent, and stack it in a dark corner of outmoded words....after "Oriental" and before "zylophone."

It ticked me off, that through the last 1/3 rd of 2018, Ron Darling et al spent 50 percent of games talking about deGrom's Cy Young chances, and that rose to 115 percent during his starts, when they would all talk over each other in the booth. An endless analysis of his pitch count, would he get another inning in, can't the damn Mets score any runs for him?

This year, it became an institutional psychosis. At one point, deGrom was pulled out with a decent lead, 4 or 5 runs I think, and, their hottest reliever, who had been worked a lot, was brought in. When asked why, Callaway said "Well, we really wanted to make sure Jakey got this win. We were so happy that Jakey-poo had a good start, we wanted to make sure that snuggle bunnykins Jakey got a W there."

Or something like that, was the gist.

This is the same deGrom that last spring concurred with his agent that if he didn't get a contract extension (he was working with a $17 million one year deal) he might have to ship some starts in August and September, even if there was a pennant race and he felt fine, just to protect his arm.

When it is about accruing Ws and Ks toward a Cy Young, of course, he is griping about coming out in the 8th.

I wish they would just erase Ws from the record books and fire Mickey Callaway. Well, I'm halfway there.
3:34 PM Oct 14th
 
DMBBHF
Hi Chuck,

You're correct.....Tom's formula is strictly for prediction purposes, not implying who deserves to win. Kind of the same purpose that Bill's HOF monitor score served. I probably should have stated that directly.

Good points on deGrom.

Thanks,

Dan
11:47 AM Oct 14th
 
chuck
Of course Tom’s Cy Young predictor formula isn’t saying who Should win it, but who (likely) Will. There’s at least one major difference between deGrom and Ryu in things that aren’t normally considered in the Cy Young voting, and that’s team defense.

Looking at the stats here on the site, the Dodgers rank first in team runs saved (136) and the Mets dead last at 93 runs below average. A huge 229-run difference between the teams, if accurate. That’s around 1.4 runs per 9 innings. For deGrom (though everyone’s defense will vary), this says he might have been getting almost .6 runs per 9 innings below average in defense, or between 13 and 14 runs below average, given his 204 innings. That’s probably overestimating it, as he had so many strikeouts, the defensive holes probably didn’t amount to that many runs. But as his ERA was 2.43 WITH that defense, it’s scary to think how good his ERA could be on a team that is 136 runs above average.
9:26 AM Oct 14th
 
DMBBHF
TJNawrocki,

First of all, why are you offended by something I didn't even say? All I said was "Then, he had an unfortunate incident, one that has been known to cause pitchers great pain over the years. He started a game at Coors Field."

That should be a fairly non-controversial statement to make. Coors Field consistently has the highest park factor when it comes to inflating offense, and the years it's not #1, it's #2.

Are you taking a position that it's NOT a challenging place for pitchers to be successful?
7:18 PM Oct 13th
 
mrbryan
Gibson wasn’t allowing unearned runs at an unusually high rate - he was just allowing earned runs at an unusually low rate. The number of unearned runs ought to be compared to innings pitched, not earned runs. On that basis, giving up 11 unearned runs in over 300 innings was actually a little low compared to his career average.
6:17 PM Oct 13th
 
TJNawrocki
As a Rockies fan, I am offended that you seem to think "Coors Field" scored a bunch of runs off of Ryu, rather than Nolan Arenado, Charlie Blackmon and David Dahl.

New Yankee Stadium is a joke, but somehow people manage the credit the Yankees for the runs they score there, rather than the ballpark.
12:28 PM Oct 13th
 
Brock Hanke
Huh. The odd thing about Gibson's 1968 unearned runs is that he had phenomenal defense up the middle. McCarver was a very good catcher. The center fielder was Curt Flood. The double play combination was Julian Javier and Dal Maxvill. The rest of the defense was, well, not so great. Thanks for the info, doncoffin.

Regarding the actual article - if you look at the monthly breakout chart, you see that Gibson wasn't the best pitcher in the world at the end of May. He was 3-5, although his ERA was low. And then, in June and July, nobody can get a loud foul off of him. The interesting thing is that this is not just a fluke of 1968. Gibson - compared to other Gibson months as opposed to anyone else's - pretty much always started out weak and then exploded sometime between mid-May and June 1. I'm old enough to have seen Gibson's whole career, and noticed this somewhere along the line. So, I started to go to Gibson starts in May.

The result was spectacular. Sometime during May, and apparently correlating with the temperatures warming up, somebody would be batting against him, and he'd throw The Pitch. There would be one pitch where Gibson seemed to lean back about a half-foot further than he had been, and then he'd throw the ball, and you'd hear it hit McCarver's glove. And the poor batter would back out of the box and hang his head, as if to say, "Dammit, Gibby. Couldn't you have waited just one more batter before this? Now, I can't hit you, and neither can anyone else, and that's not going to stop until maybe September."

In short, Gibson seemed to be a hot-weather pitcher, who needed the warmth to fully extend his motion, although he wasn't exactly failing when the weather was cold.
8:00 PM Oct 12th
 
doncoffin
My memory told me that, in 1968, an unusually large percentage of the runs Gibson gave up were "unearned""--there was an error involved. And my memory was right. 22.45% of the runs he gave up (11 out of 49) were unearned. His career rate was 11.46%. So had he yielded unearned runs at his career rate, he'd have yielded only 44 runs. As amazing as his season was, he was (apparently) hurt by his defense.

On May 12, he lost 3-2 to Houston--with 1 UER.
On August 24, he lost 6-5--with 3 UER.
On September 11, and again on September 22, he last 3-2,--with 1 UER in each game.
3:36 PM Oct 12th
 
 
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